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Old Feb 26, 2004, 9:21 PM   #11
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You guys and gals were too advanced for me... I started with cassette tapes as storage since floppy was still a luxury, and random access meant looking @ the 3-digits rolling on the tape counter !!!

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old Feb 26, 2004, 10:08 PM   #12
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Hey, I started out using a PDP11 with reel-to-reel tapes and a drum. So take that!

But now I just bought my first external drive (250G) to backup my pictures. Like bcoultry I wasn't being good about backing up. I gave up on the CD stuff (one days shooting spills over to 2 CDs some days, so that right there causes trouble.) Gotta do DVD, but I don't trust the current format battles to pick one for my use.... not yet, any ways.

Hey Mr_Saginaw, I don't manage that much disk space, but I write software designed to process that much data. It's a whole different world.

Eric
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 3:47 AM   #13
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.........I started with cassette tapes as storage since floppy was still a luxury, and random access meant looking @ the 3-digits rolling on the tape counter !!! ............

At least you didn't have the HD sector zero and the FAT Index to worry about so much, you might lose one file with a section of twisted or damaged/edited tape - BUT not the lot! I seem to remember files were loaded sequentially on to the tape.

When we think of backups and multi- gigabytes of hard drives, it's also worth thinking about how secure the file indexing system is as well. The terabyte storage man probably has the answers, but I suspect multi-drive backup systems need something like RAID architecture to take care of distributing the indexes for recovery of other drives. VOX
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 4:31 AM   #14
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Eric

We do go back a long way do we? I still remember my 1st board where the toggle switches was the keyboard... and the excitement on my 1st job out of college was to mount thoses stack of "dinner plates" on the DEC's! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Now that we can get cheap 4G about the size of 2 quarters, and most likely the processing power on today cameras can probably put thoses early roomfull of computers to shame too!
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 6:51 AM   #15
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I've come across a multi-GB system, RAID protected that failed. This was December last year and the supplier was reputable. We had to go back to the backup tapes.

If I was using RAID at home and had a RAID problem I'd take a backup at that point (another backup not overwriting a previous one) and then shut down. A RAID failure, even on mirrored instead of stripe, can leave you with a corupt file depending on the disk activity at the point of failure. Also, the actual point of failure is a critical. A faiure within the disk, yes, RAID may help. A disk subsystem controller or another part of the subsystem and it may not.

RAID tends to be popular with real-time systems where you hope to end up with at least your main database or your journals intact after a failure. For the kind of thing we do a nice big disk and lots of backups suites me fine. I also do a test restore of random images on a regular basis and keep a set of backups with a third party.

Regards,
Graham.

p.s. I started with cassette tape as well.
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 8:24 AM   #16
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I am starting to feel really old with this crowd. But loving every minute of it.
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 8:33 AM   #17
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eric s, Vox, & NHL are young pups. The first computer I used had vacumn tubes (valves), relays, i/o was five channel paper tape, and memory was a tank of mercury. When the new computer was bought, it had discreet transistors and eight channel paper tape i/o. Code could be written in ALGOL instead of raw Octal - much easier.
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 8:40 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew
eric s, Vox, & NHL are young pups. The first computer I used had vacumn tubes (valves), relays, i/o was five channel paper tape, and memory was a tank of mercury. When the new computer was bought, it had discreet transistors and eight channel paper tape i/o. Code could be written in ALGOL instead of raw Octal - much easier.
...and you don't have to worry about corrupted files and FAT either (but you probably brought down the electrical grid)!!!

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 9:03 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL
...and you don't have to worry about corrupted files and FAT either ...!
The only FAT in the computer room was the grease on the fish & chips - but you did have to be pretty good at splicing paper tape.

The tank of mercury worked as memory by being an acustic delay line. So it made noise as the computer was running. Some of the nerds managed to write programs that made the "memory" play tunes.
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Old Feb 27, 2004, 9:55 AM   #20
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Quote:
Some of the nerds managed to write programs that made the "memory" play tunes.
Oh, no. Now I'm in trouble. I've never tried to write a program who's side effect was to play music. But I have tried to use seeks on drum memory to walk it across the room. Didn't work (but boy did it shake.) And I have written programs that blink the lights on the front of the computer in specific patterns.

Oh, those were the days.

And writing a wheel chair race game on a TSR-80 with a cassette tape drive. (Eric starts to stare off into the distance with a glazed look.)

Eric

ps. Oh course, I'm not really that old at 33. I just had access to some old stuff at my highschool. When adminstration was done with the machine, we got to play with it. I was using Dec Unix and loading tape drives at age.... 14 or so. My dad would bring home punch cards from work for us to play with, but I never actually programmed on them.
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