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Old Sep 22, 2014, 11:23 PM   #1
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Default Best mirrorless system

So, say you've made the decision to sell your DSLR equipment and make the jump to mirrorless. Who has the best system? By system, I mean the combination of camera design, lens and other accessory support.
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 12:18 AM   #2
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OLYMPUS Period!
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 7:32 AM   #3
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Yeah, what he said.

Only because it's been at it longer than anybody else.

The key factor in judging mirrorless systems is this: Do they have a good selection of lenses and accessories? That's Olympus. Panasonic and Sony are close, but Olympus is best.

But the question you didn't ask is this: Who has the best mirrorless system for you?

We can only answer that if we know the answer to this question: What do you want to shoot?
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 11:12 AM   #4
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As TCav says... who has the best system for YOU...?
All the systems have their strong suit... a feature which puts them above the others...
(e.g- I love the Nikon 1 speed)...
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 11:41 AM   #5
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I mostly shoot family and travel outings. I spent a very short hour at the Mecca aka B&H Photo and left with the thought that Olympus is the way I should go. I could spend all day in B&H and never see the entire store completely.
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 1:33 PM   #6
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If I were starting from scratch with a new mirrorless system, I would probably go with the Fuji XT-1 and the 18-135 WR lens, to start with. Then, by the time my finances had recovered from that, I would look for additions, if I found I needed any.
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 2:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VTphotog View Post
If I were starting from scratch with a new mirrorless system, I would probably go with the Fuji XT-1 and the 18-135 WR lens, to start with. Then, by the time my finances had recovered from that, I would look for additions, if I found I needed any.
The fellow I spoke with at B&H said the same thing but the price tag is indeed steep. The two cameras he recommended to me were the aforementioned Fuji and the Sony A7 which is even more expensive. Oh to be able to spend an entire day at B&H! I live in a city with only one real camera store and it is a Nikon dealer, which isn't bad, just like to be able to sample all of the brands before buying.
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Old Sep 23, 2014, 3:37 PM   #8
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Mirrorless systems all have one feature in common: the short flange focal distance (the distance between the lens mount and the image sensor.)

The larger the sensor, the greater a problem the short flange focal distance becomes. The combination of a large sensor and a short flange focal distance means the lens must bend light more in order to project an image over the entire image sensor. That doesn't mean it's not possible. It just means that the lenses won't perform as well or will cost more than lenses for longer flange focal distances and/or smaller sensors. Two optical flaws that are common in mirrorless systems with large sensors are field curvature (soft corners) and transverse chromatic aberration. The CA can be reduced in post or even in-camera, but the field curvature requires complex and expensive optical designs to overcome. Thus, while mirrorless bodies aren't any more expensive than typical entry level dSLRs, their lenses usually are.

For that reason, I recommend not getting Sony's 'Full Frame' mirrorless cameras, and I wouldn't recommend Canon's, Sony's or Fuji's APS-C mirrorless cameras.
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Last edited by TCav; Sep 23, 2014 at 7:18 PM.
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