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Old Mar 12, 2004, 5:15 PM   #1
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Default Slide scanner

Looking to copy alot of slides to a dvd disk,Any good ideas for a good slide scanner,thanks
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Old Mar 12, 2004, 6:53 PM   #2
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How many is a ďlotĒ. Inexpensive film scanners have you insert the slides one at a time. The scanning time is long enough that you have to wait a while, but short enough you canít do a lot of other things. It is a really time consuming process.

Film and slides seem to accumulate dust. Despite my best efforts to use a clean makeup brush followed by compressed air I still get some dust. And yes I ground the brush and film after the wipe. My slides are all old and tend to have other stuff accumulated on them that the air wonít remove. There is a technology called Digital Ice that uses IR to identify and remove dust, scratches and small spots. It comes only on higher end scanners.

If you want to spend big bucks for the scanner there are some good units that either come with slide feeders or they can be purchased separately. All of those have Digital Ice.

I have an inexpensive but competent film scanner and have been avoiding the job of converting my lifetime of negatives and slides to digital. I have ďlotsĒ of film to convert. I use the film scanner just for specific images, but converting my entire collection isnít in the cards on that scanner.

Iíve been seriously considering ordering an Epson 4870 flatbed to convert everything to digital. It takes 8 slides or 24 film images at once (4 strips). It isnít fast scanning film and slides, especially if you engage Digital Ice. But once it is starts it can be ignored on a fast computer with plenty of RAM Ė I hope. I donít want to have to take out all of the crap from dust and stuff in Photoshop so I need Digital Ice. A dedicated film scanner, even a good one, usually just takes one film strip at a time.

One advantage of slides is that grain isnít as big a problem. Iíll have to run a Neat Image profile and batch process all of the scans with the same film. Grain isnít quite as bad on a flatbed as the concentrated light source of a film scanner really accentuates grain. But it is still awful on 400 ASA film, and quite a bit of my film is from my little carry camera that did best with 400 ASA.

Good review of the 4870: http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/int...870/page_1.htm
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Old Mar 13, 2004, 2:15 AM   #3
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Default Re: Slide scanner

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Originally Posted by Ssurace56
Looking to copy alot of slides to a dvd disk
For an overview of the field see http://www.hamrick.com/. Whatever scanner you get, I recommend Ed Hamrick's Vuescan software most highly. It works with many flatbeds as well as dedicated filmscanners, and makes the OEM software look stupid.

Don't expect the transfer process to be quick & easy, though. That's why I got my digicam
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Old Mar 13, 2004, 8:37 PM   #4
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I have used VueScan for my film scanner for years. I donít like the driver on the scanner and VueScan is great. But the reviewer of the Epson 4870 said the Epson twain driver was as good as the Silverfast lite that also comes with the scanner, and Silverfast is pretty good. Epson has come late to the scanner driver game Ė I think the 3200 was the first consumer model they made with even a histogram. But the 3200 and 4870 appear to have decent Epson drivers and they also come with Silverfast. So Iím not sure VueScan would be necessary for them.

The Epson 3200 is a bargain right now but it doesnít have Digital Ice and takes only half as many film strips and slides. It comes with Photoshop Elements and Silverfast lite like the 4870. The Canon 9900 does have Digital Ice and the large capacity, but the driver isnít great and VueScan wonít work with it Ė Hamrick says Canon wonít share codes with him so he can adapt it. I would probably already have a 9900 if VueScan would work with it.
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Old Mar 14, 2004, 2:28 AM   #5
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I use a Nikon Coolscan 9000 at work, which can take in five slides/or twelve 35mm (two strips of six)/or three 6x6 120mm negs at a time. It's fast compared to others, but it's still a waiting game on any computer - I can go check e-mail and get coffee while it scans a single 35mm negative, let alone a 6x7 negative But Digital Ice rocks!! No more cleaning dust, scratches, long streaks, specks, smal smudges, etc, in Photoshop!! And compared to having negatives scanned at a lab that I used to use, my scans are cleaner, have no magenta cast, and best of all, MUCH less jpg compression artifacts.

As for flatbed scanners to scan film strips, mounted or not, bad idea. Even if the flatbed scanner has a film adapter, quality will not be the same as from a dedicated film scanner. I have an Epson Expression 1600 with a transparency adapter and have NEVER achieved decent film scans out of it (bought it at the time for its document feeder speed). Even a cheap film scanner can focus better and yield a usable 2800dpi scan compared to a blurry and clumpy 4000dpi scan from a flatbed.
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Old Mar 14, 2004, 8:14 AM   #6
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Quote:
As for flatbed scanners to scan film strips, mounted or not, bad idea. Even if the flatbed scanner has a film adapter, quality will not be the same as from a dedicated film scanner. I have an Epson Expression 1600 with a transparency adapter and have NEVER achieved decent film scans out of it
It isnít quite as black and white as it was. The Epson 3200 and 4850 are putting out decent scans from 35mm. If your experience with an old flatbed isnít to constitute your entire lifetimeís knowledge on the subject you might look at this: http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/int...870/page_7.htm On subsequent pages he used a Nikon 4000 and the scans were sharper Ė but the Epson wasnít blown out of the water by comparison.

The Nikon 9000 is going for a couple grand and the 5000 for only a grand, but you would have to buy the slide feeder to make the cheaper one worthwhile. If you need the very best quality then a good film scanner with a slide feeder might be worthwhile. But it appears the new Epson flatbeds will do slides at least as well as an inexpensive 2800 PPI film scanner. And you can do 8 at once and have Digital Ice.
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Old Mar 14, 2004, 11:36 AM   #7
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Thanks for the link, it was good reading. It's good to see that technology has not stood still and I see the results of that Epson are leaps and bounds superior to what my flatbed could ever produce. Those samples are pretty good indeed
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