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Old Mar 22, 2004, 3:28 PM   #1
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Default The Sun and Photography

I'm going to be in Honduras on an island later next week and was thinking of doing some time lapse photography with the sun in the morning. Anything I should consider or reconsider before I do this? I've got a UV filter but I doubt that'll do much. Thanks.
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 4:01 PM   #2
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Most cameras come with a warning not to take pictures directly towards the sun. I can only assume that time lapsed pictures are the worst to do.

On the other hand, I know people who have taken pictures directly at the sun and done no damage to their cameras.

I don't know if I should believe the manufacturers warning or not.

Eric
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 4:35 PM   #3
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I agree with what Eric said, but it doesn’t seem to apply to early morning and late evening sun. I see hundreds of shots with low sun and it doesn’t seem to be a problem. I know I have taken shots of the sun just before sunset and just after sunrise with no problem. Maybe a rule of thumb is that it is OK as long as the sun is reddish instead of white.

Blue or violet light has the highest energy and red the lowest. Doesn’t make sense since IR heats things, but the higher the frequency the higher the energy. Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle is based on that. The reason the sky is blue is that the atmosphere diffuses blue light, and if it filters through enough atmosphere, like in the morning or evening, enough of the blue is diffused out that it appears red. Since the more energetic light is filtered out it might be safer for the camera.

All that being said I’m not going to buy you a new camera if you burn out the CCD.
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 4:48 PM   #4
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If you're going to do any long exposures you might consider a neutral density filter.
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 6:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slipe

All that being said I’m not going to buy you a new camera if you burn out the CCD.
Darn. Nobody loves me...
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 8:12 AM   #6
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Well,

I guess a good rule of thumb would be, if you can look at it comfortably, then the camera can too.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 9:18 AM   #7
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Keep a lens cap or something similar over the front of the lens between shots. That will help avoid things getting too hot in there in the mean time. I used to do some astronomical work on sun spots (purely amateur) and you could practicaly fry an egg on some of the lenses.

Regards,
Graham.

p.s. ok I exagerate a bit.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 9:35 AM   #8
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I know a fellow who took pictures of an eclispe (non-digital) and the heat of the sun through the lens melted the metal shutter.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 3:18 PM   #9
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Hmmm... I'm reconsidering.... :lol:
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 8:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deane Johnson
I know a fellow who took pictures of an eclispe (non-digital) and the heat of the sun through the lens melted the metal shutter.
He failed to protect the camera with a filter, just like we must protect our eyes with filters during a solar eclipse. I have seen folks taking pictures of partial eclipses and they all used the filters for direct solar viewing.
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