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Old Mar 29, 2004, 3:44 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zordey
IMO it looks like the blurr is being caused by you pressing the shutter button and shaking the camera slightly, because all the blurr seems to be vertical.

Are you using the flash on the camera?

U could try forcing the camera to flash instead of auto flash, this may speed up the shutter speed.

You may also be rushing taking the pictures (i used to do this, pressing the button and lowering the camera to walk on because i felt i was in other peoples way) try holding the camera perfectly still for about 2 seconds after it has taken the picture.

(a friends dad had a Camaro, very rare here in Northern Ireland, but it had a lovely sounding engine )
I figured it was the camera shaking when I clicked it but then how would anyone expect you to take a picture without using a tripod. Again, this doesn't make sense. It seems I paid 2X more for a camera that has all the great features but won't work without a tripod cause just pressing the button down all the way once holding it half way until it is "GREEN" shakes the camera.. But then why would it do it when the camera is not touched and the timer is what snaps the picture when I am not touching the camera..

In theory, setting the camera on the ground and alowing the timer to take the picture would be no different than it being on a tripod and clicking the shutton button.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 4:32 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camarosource
In theory, setting the camera on the ground and alowing the timer to take the picture would be no different than it being on a tripod and clicking the shutton button.
yea this should be as good as using a tripod (probably even better)

Just had a quick look at what camera you are using there, IMO you need to be good to take a hand held picture at full 10x zoom (380mm equiv) if it has no antishake function.

Another thing that i have found that sometimes works for me is to press the button fully and ignore the 2 stage thing, this means that you have the time that it takes the camera to autofocus to stabilise the camera again before it takes the picture.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 7:41 AM   #13
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I looked at several dozen of your photographs and it appears to me to be camera shake.

I couldn't tell for sure, but it appears the strobe was turned off and that you were using ambient light for everything. The shutter speed would be pretty slow, maybe down around 1/15 second (just a guess).

I assume you don't have this same problem shooting outside in sunlight.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 7:57 AM   #14
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Well, just to throw in my two cents worth, especially seless since I don't use this camera.

Try this - Try a tripod and try hand held on the same shoot.

If just the handheld are blurry then you need to modify your shooting technique. Also, since your shooting auto, what is the speed of the shots? Perhpaps your auto mode is selecting to small an aperture, resulting oin a slow speed.

If all the settings appear to be working properly And, If they are both blurry, then the camera needs repair.

Keep in mind that if the tripod shots are good then this would occur with ANY camera - It would be your technique at fault.

Dave
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 8:24 AM   #15
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In looking at the camera's specs, it appears it has an unusually long shutter delay unless it's pre-focused. I am wondering if you're accidently moving before the camera has actually fired the shot.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 8:38 AM   #16
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Get an EXIF reader so you can find out what the camera settings were when the shot was taken: f/stop, shutter speed, macro, ... You might have it set in some way that is using the lowest ISO, smallest aperature, and therefore a long shutter speed.

If you are lucky with your choice of EXIF reader (check in the forum for your specific camera), and the camera records that data, the EXIF data will tell you the focus distance. Try some fairly close, middle, and distance shots to see if the EXIF reported focus distance changes. Could be that your camera has a flaw that keeps it from focusing properly.

Look at the lens: is it dirty?

Quote:
However there are a few pictures (on ground level) that were lever on the ground and with the timer on, it snapped the picture without my touching it. That would result in NO possible camera shake and it still came out blurry..
A good test, and one you should repeat with the camera well off the ground to make sure it is focusing on a distant object. Set it on a car hood, picnic table, fence post, ...
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 10:04 AM   #17
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I downloaded one of the pictures in that folder (100_1405.JPG) and looked at the EXIF data to see what settings were used to take the picture. Windows reported:

f2.8, 1/4 of a second, 6mm (38mm 35-mm equivalent)

No ISO was reported.

I assume that info is right.

No one can hold a camera steady with a 1/4 of a second shutter speed. You'd have to be petrafied. Heck, most (all?) tripods can't either.

You need more light. The human eye is more sensitive to light than a camera, so what looks "bright enough" to you isn't always for the camera. You MUST get a faster shutter speed. There are only two way to do this.

1) Get more light. Use a flash, in your case.
2) Become more sensitive to light. Use a higher ISO setting.

The flash built into a camera are not normally very strong. A good one has a reach of about 10 feet, but it looks like yours goes a bit futher looking at the review. Unfortunatley there isn't a hot shoe on that camera, so on-camera flash isn't possible. So #1 probably isn't an option. You could get an external flash that syncs off your flash, but that risks having it fire when someone else takes a picture.

Your S50 might have automatically picked the ISO for you, allowing a higher shutter speed. So you might not have noticed the problem. Many cameras have a mode that they do that in, so you might check the manual to see if yours does.

Eric

ps. My brother just got that camera and likes it a lot. He hasn't tried to take the same pictures as you, but I wouldn't rule out that camera just yet.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 12:10 PM   #18
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Quote:
Just had a quick look at what camera you are using there, IMO you need to be good to take a hand held picture at full 10x zoom (380mm equiv) if it has no antishake function.
When you say "Full 10x zoom" are you thinking I have it zoomed in on something and taking pictures? I didn't always use the zoom at all for some of the pics.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 12:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deane Johnson
I looked at several dozen of your photographs and it appears to me to be camera shake.

I couldn't tell for sure, but it appears the strobe was turned off and that you were using ambient light for everything. The shutter speed would be pretty slow, maybe down around 1/15 second (just a guess).

I assume you don't have this same problem shooting outside in sunlight.
Strobe as in the flash? I used the flash for many of them because otherwise it came out dark. I also used set the Exposure to 1 or 2 for most all of them because again on the LCD the pictures were coming out darkish.
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Old Mar 29, 2004, 12:27 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric s
I downloaded one of the pictures in that folder (100_1405.JPG) and looked at the EXIF data to see what settings were used to take the picture. Windows reported:

f2.8, 1/4 of a second, 6mm (38mm 35-mm equivalent)

No ISO was reported.

I assume that info is right.

No one can hold a camera steady with a 1/4 of a second shutter speed. You'd have to be petrafied. Heck, most (all?) tripods can't either.

You need more light. The human eye is more sensitive to light than a camera, so what looks "bright enough" to you isn't always for the camera. You MUST get a faster shutter speed. There are only two way to do this.

1) Get more light. Use a flash, in your case.
2) Become more sensitive to light. Use a higher ISO setting.

The flash built into a camera are not normally very strong. A good one has a reach of about 10 feet, but it looks like yours goes a bit futher looking at the review. Unfortunatley there isn't a hot shoe on that camera, so on-camera flash isn't possible. So #1 probably isn't an option. You could get an external flash that syncs off your flash, but that risks having it fire when someone else takes a picture.

Your S50 might have automatically picked the ISO for you, allowing a higher shutter speed. So you might not have noticed the problem. Many cameras have a mode that they do that in, so you might check the manual to see if yours does.

Eric

ps. My brother just got that camera and likes it a lot. He hasn't tried to take the same pictures as you, but I wouldn't rule out that camera just yet.
I used "portrait" for most of the pictures that day because it was seeming that the "camera mode [green camera icon" was showing a bit blurry on the LCD screen. I'm not sure how I could have got more light as the auto show was VERY bright. Lights reflected off the cars from everywhere. I also had the Exposure (light sensetivity) set to either 1 or 2 (mostly two) along with the auto flash which was going on for most of the shots. I was finding that with the light exposure set to 2, with the use of the flash was coming out perfectly (on the LCD screen) using the Portrait mode.. Was this wrong?

If I am OUTSIDE and want to take pictures of parked cars in the DAYLIGHT SUN.. which is the BEST mode to stick with?

* Camera Mode
* Portrait Mode
* Action Mode (would think help camera shake since it's supposed to take moving objects?)
*Night Mode
* PASM (P? A? S? or M?) [Which settings would I want to change and which should be left alone]?
* With Landscape Macro ON/OFF?
* Up Close Macro ON/OFF
* Flash ON or OFF (Forced or auto)
* Light Exposure setting to which?

Thank you VERY MUCH for everyones help. I really appreciate the time you all are taking in helping me. :-)
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