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Old Mar 30, 2004, 11:28 PM   #11
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I know the reflective coating has a lot to do with it. The real cheap ones will easily scratch off (opposite the burn side) and then the light will shine right through.

The more expensive ones usually have a textured finish and are more durable.

Also be careful about what you use to mark on them. Your standard Sharpie marker will eventually seep though the coating and ruin the data. that is why they sell those markers that look exactly the same but are labeled for CD use.
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 12:19 AM   #12
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I also have duplicate copies of the original RAW and finished images saved on a separate disk drive and labeled as ARCHIVED ... of course that can always be lost as well. I don't write on my CD's, I don't put labels on them; I store them in plastic sheets with contact sheets as well. If they get damaged, they get damaged. I'll get over it.
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 12:58 AM   #13
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If you search back, there was a long thread about CDs awhile back. I learned at lot from it, so I'd recommend finding it and reading it.

The biggest factor is the type of coating that is used. It can oxidize (sp?) and some go faster than others. How you store them is huge.

Go read it, really.

Eric
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 2:40 AM   #14
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I'm with Eric, I shoot almost exclusively in jpg. But on small assignments or when I know I won't be shooting more than 100 frames, I do shoot raw. I wish the D100 would output jpgs with the same image clarity as raw files converted to jpg/tif. As for converting the raw files, I batch them in Nikon Capture. A fast computer helps in this respect. My old computer used to take 1.5-2 hours to convert about 90 NEF's. My new computer takes 17 minutes! :lol:
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 9:47 AM   #15
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I had never heard that Sharpies will seep into the CD ruining data.

I'm doomed
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 10:33 AM   #16
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Developing RAW is still a lot faster than developing film or slides
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 11:05 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingsnut
I had never heard that Sharpies will seep into the CD ruining data.

I'm doomed
You still have some time...I think it is a kin to licking to the center of a tootsie roll pop (remember that little owl and the kid...how many licks does it take?)

When you get a chance, think about duplicating the old CDs and maybe go with Ohenry's idea with no writing at all or buy one of those expensive markers.
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 1:59 PM   #18
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Yep I've already re-copied a few CD's of the important stuff..

Thx for the heads up!
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 2:35 PM   #19
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I usually shoot in JPG when I'm indoors in the studio where I have the lighting metered perfectly and custom white balance is right on. Anything else, I shoot RAW because the lighting and color balance can be unpredictable.
I use Adobe Photoshop CS to convert RAW files. My only other choice is the Fuji Raw converter EX. Some people say the fuji program has slightly better quality in the detail but it doesn't have nearly the amount of "toys" that Adobe has - such as chromatic aberration, exposure level, vignetting, etc. Both the FUJI and Adobe programs have pretty good automation.
All raw files have a jpg embedded in them; some cameras let you choose the size of the jpg. There is usually a program to extract the jpg from the raw.
I copy the RAW files to a folder on the hard drive, then extract the jpg thumbnails from them. The Fuji S2 only lets me do 960x1440, but that is enough to show the customer, and be able to see enough detail to know which shots are the best ones - the ones that I will actually process.
Then I process the ones that are actually good in Photoshop CS Raw, do all the stuff in Photoshop I need to do, and save them in 16 bit PSD format with all the layers and stuff, in Adobe RGB. Then I flatten the image, convert to whatever ICC profile I need, and save it as a JPG or TIFF depending on what's needed. I use a different directory for the RAW, PSD, and JPG or TIF files. Then I burn the whole darn thing with all the directories to DVD.
I'm not worried about future-proofing RAW files. I don't get what you guys are talking about. If there is a program to do it now, why can't you use that same program in 15 years? just keep the CD it came on. Are you worried about it not being compatible with Windows 2020 or whatever version they have that year? I'm sure there will always be some program available.
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Old Mar 31, 2004, 6:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
I'm not worried about future-proofing RAW files. I don't get what you guys are talking about. If there is a program to do it now, why can't you use that same program in 15 years? just keep the CD it came on. Are you worried about it not being compatible with Windows 2020 or whatever version they have that year? I'm sure there will always be some program available.
That is exactly what I'm worried about. It will eventually become a loss for Canon to keep mantaining the software.

There will come a time when it won't run on modern hardware with a modern os. Maybe someone will have a virtual machine that I can run the older OS in and keep using the older software. Who knows?

I expect there to be a point in my lifetime that I will not be able to translate the RAW files that I have. And since its a propritary format I won't be able to pay someone to write a decoder for me. With jpg or tiff I can always do that.

You should still back them up. And you should back up the converted-to TIFF.

Being in the sotfware business, I can say confidently that there won't always be a program to do it.

Eric
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