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Old Apr 10, 2004, 5:08 PM   #1
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Default Continuous Shooting

I have a general question about continuous shooting as it relates to those that own a dSLR or who have an EVF on their cameras.

"The horses are coming down the stretch ...". If I understand correctly in using one of the above mentioned cameras, a momentary blanking of the screen will happen in between photos when using continuous shooting mode.

So what is the trick to keep the horses within the "frame" as each picture is taken?

My current Canon G2 has a glass eyepiece which allows me to see the picture, and follow along, when using continuous mode. I ask only because I am thinking about upgrading to a better camera, but not sure how I will keep my wife riding her horse in the frames as she moves around our riding area.

Thanks for any help.
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 7:24 PM   #2
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Quote:
So what is the trick to keep the horses within the "frame" as each picture is taken?
You merely pan the camera at the same pace as the object moving. (Easier said than done, of course )
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 7:59 PM   #3
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Practice makes perfect!! as Henry said pan with it..
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 8:32 PM   #4
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I have a feeling there are going to be a lot of "half-horse" pictures in my future!
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 9:13 PM   #5
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It isn't all that bad.

The live image is blanked out for only a short time between each shot so you still have visual feedback as you are panning. The Minolta A1, for example, shoots in continuous drive mode at 2 frames per second (500 milliseconds per shot) and the EVF blanks for only a small period of each shot, maybe 50-100 milliseconds, so your eye/brain can easily interpolate the scene through the blanking period. If you pan smoothly as you squeeze (don't jab) the shutter release (practice as Cowboy says) you should have no difficulty keeping the horses in frame.
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 10:19 PM   #6
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You can buy or build a viewfinder that slips into the hot-shoe. Likely not real acurate if your focal length is much over 100mm (equiv). Depending on what you are going to do with the photos, you might get away with overshooting and figure on cropping afterwards to deal with that.
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Old Apr 10, 2004, 11:16 PM   #7
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From personal experience yes there will be a lot of half horses in you pictures for a while. It's only really disgusting when there's nothing in the frame because you either started to soon or too late. However this is one of those times that the only thing that helps is practice . . .etc.

Suzan
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