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Old May 19, 2004, 7:52 PM   #1
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Which is really better to get these days? A good35mm or a digital camera? And how do they both compare in terms of giving quality photos? What are the pros and cons?
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Old May 19, 2004, 9:02 PM   #2
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Your asking "between a GOOD 35mm" and " A digital" camera? How about A 35mm and aGOOD digital camera? Why does it have to be a contest....get one of each.










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Old May 21, 2004, 11:50 AM   #3
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How about a 35mm vs. medium, or large format film camera?

No matter what "they" say, digital cameras still aren't up to competing with 35mm. The problem is the way the CCD is designed (in a Bayer pattern), 40% of the light that comes into the camera is lost. There's only one type of camera that I've personally seen that can come close to film, and that's the Foveon technology, but it has some of its own quirks. The Foveon uses layers of colour sensitive material, similar to what film does.

But digital in general is still in its infancy while film has over 100 years of history...digital still has a long way to go to catch up.
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Old May 21, 2004, 10:35 PM   #4
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I just wanted to know which is better film or digital cause I thought digital had the edge based on the different features the digital camera offered over the 35 mm. I want a digital camera though for the added features and convenient too. I can't put pictures from a 35 mm directly to my PC with ease can I? The digital camera's picture quality isn't bad either. Seen some nice shots.

Thanks for the response.
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Old May 24, 2004, 10:22 PM   #5
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Regarding putting pictures from 35mm on the PC, you can scan the pictures...to scan slides or negatives, there are dedicated slide/negative scanners available.

As for which is better, it depends on better for what? I've mostly shot with digital for almost two years myself because it's inexpensive to use and convient with its shorter actual focal length (59mm actual vs. 380mm that's the 35mm equivalent), but there are times I still shoot with film for quality, or if I need to produce a larger print.

BTW, in many parts of the world you can get a CD of your prints made right at the time when you have your film developed.

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Old May 24, 2004, 10:46 PM   #6
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Mikefellh wrote:
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...No matter what "they" say, digital cameras still aren't up to competing with 35mm. ...
Are you really sure that one of the scanning back cameras cannot outdo a 35mm? Though there do seem to be a few folks who claim that the top of the line dSLRs is not the equal (or better than) 35mm, there very few who will make that claim for anything that isn't shot off a tripod.
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Old May 25, 2004, 8:19 AM   #7
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Unless you are talking about the absolute best professional grade film, which most people don't buy, the top tier digital beats all but the best film cameras.

But we have to ask again, beats in what way? The Nikon F5 has a better AF system than almost any camera out there, film or digital. The best Canon film is its equal (EOS 3?), for digital the Nikon D2x and Canon 1D Mark II are probably better.

All the top digitals have very little noise compared to the grain visible in even the best films. All the serious film pro photographers I know use 100 ISO film and push it to 200 (they would use 50 ISO and push it to 100, but I don't think you can get 50ISO film any more.) But the digital pro photographers I know regularly use 200 & 400 ISO. I know one with a 1D Mark II who just leaves the camera at ISO 640 about 70% of the time (he shoots birds for stock, so shutter speed matters... but grain is still almost not present. I know that 400 ISO on my 10D show noise, and 800 is harsh.)

For ease of use all the top tier cameras (digital & film) have way more buttons and confusing settings than the cheaper film cameras.

I'm not sure what features you are wondering about. There are many features that just aren't on a film camera. Which ones are you wondering about.

Eric
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