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Old Jun 30, 2004, 6:35 AM   #1
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I am now on the edge of buying a digital camera, and the products coming into my eyesight are Canon A80, Fuji S7000 , Kodak 6490.

when not considering other elements, a most obvious difference lies in the ability of optical zoom , they are respectively 3x 6x 10x. I know the higher the statistics are, the further it could shoot. But when speaking of the exact difference among these statistics, I have no idea, so I post here to seek some help:

Can anybody give me some sample pictures to show what is the exacteffecttaken with3x 6x and 10x optical zoom? Ah, when it handles with the same scene, it would be best. :?

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By the way, I am Chinese, glad to have found the forum, it's great!
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 3:59 PM   #2
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This site has 1-12X posted. You can download and compare them side by side: http://bright.dlancer.net/fz10/zoomtest/
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 7:17 PM   #3
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The "X" lens business is mis-leading. It's really a ratio of the lowest to highest zoom a lens will yield. My 10X Canon Pro90 goes from 38-380mm (35mm equivalent). This is pretty good at the long end, but isn't great at the wide angle end. You're better off looking at the bottom and top end of the range. Most point and shoot cameras are pretty sad at wide angle shots because the sensors are small, compared to the 35mm film size that are the standard. Even expensive digital SLRs have smaller sensors (tho' much bigger than in the point and shoot models) that result in much better telephoto than wide angleperformance. Some VERY expensive DSLRs have sensors the same size as a 35mm film.

Be careful before you buy any digital camera. Read the fine print and don't get tricked by the "X" factor or the megapixel numbers.
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 7:52 PM   #4
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To Slipe:

The site you give me is very helpful, I now konw the exact difference between these various optical zooms. Emmm, I think I have to consider Panasonic FZ10 for a while. It looks as though FZ10 can make pretty good pictures. But people around me don't talk much about FZ10 or digicams of Panasonic, most brands they are talking about are Canon, Fujifilm, Kodak and Olympus. How is the situation by you, Which is the most used brand with your friends?

To Wildman:

Your suggestion does make sense, it must be the words from the bottom of your heart after using your own digicam. I have kept those words in my mind, but one thing I am not sure is wheather our local dealers would let me have the pictures printed out, because many shops here don't give the buyers a chance to test the machines.



In the end , thank you all!:-)
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 8:03 PM   #5
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Ahh, I forgot to ask:

What is a "point and shoot camera" as Wildman said "Most point and shoot cameras are pretty sad at wide angle shots ":?


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Old Jun 30, 2004, 8:51 PM   #6
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Point and shoot, or compact cameras,indicate any camera that does not have an interchangeable lens system.

On the other end of the spectrum, you have Single Lens Reflex systems (SLRs) that allow the photographer more creativity in changing lenses.

Generally, there is more differences then that in the digital world. Point and shoot cameras allow you to use your LCD as a live viewfinder to compose your picture. SLRs, due to a physical mirror in the light path, cannot use the LCD as a live viewfinder. LCDs on DSLRs are used only to see your shot after you take it, a big difference. There are more differences, but I won't get into it. Take a look at Steve's reviews to get a general feel for the differences.

Most point and shoot cameras, because the lens is integral to the camera, are astudy in compromisation. The standard for the longest time was a 3x optical zoom, which basically gave you a not so wide wide angle, and a very low telephoto.
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Old Jun 30, 2004, 10:42 PM   #7
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Fixed-Lens -- NOT Point 'n Shoot

Forgive me for butting in, but ...

Fixed-Lens ISNOT Point 'n Shoot

As a longtime user of 35mm SLRs before getting a digital camera (Canon G3), I take exception to calling every non-interchangeable lens digital a 'Point and Shoot'. Yes, I feel constrained by having limited wide-angle and zoom capability, but all except the cheapest digital fixed-lens cameras offer a whole lot more flexibility than PnS would suggest. As far as I'm concerned, being able to see the live image on a fixed-lens digital's LCD, without parallax error, makes the shooting experience a lot like a film SLR. With AE, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, and full Manual shooting modes, fixed-lens digitals are NOT point 'n shoot cameras, IMHO.

Steve in Omaha :shock:








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Old Jun 30, 2004, 11:25 PM   #8
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That a point and shoot camera is anything without interchangeable lenses is just plain absurd.

Point and shoot usually refers to cameras without manual exposure and focus controls. But even digital cameras that often fall in the point and shoot category have more controls than their film counterparts did.

As an example of a camera without interchangeable lenses that is anything but point and shoot look at the Minolta A2. It has more physical controls than most DSLRs. The high quality EVF is not only through the lens but also through the processor. If it looks right in the EVF it is probably a good shot. It can display a real time histogram in the EVF which the DSLRs can't, and allows you to tweak any setting without removing your eye from the viewfinder. There is also more information available in the viewfinder than with a DSLR. It has a big manual zoom ring and a focus ring. I'm not saying it is as good overall as a DSLR, but it is probably more sophisticated. Most makers have flagship prosumer models that are quite sophisticated.

I wouldn't pay much attention to which brands people around you like. I happen to have a Minolta, Olympus, Pentax and Panasonic because they had the combination of features I wanted and the reviews and sample photos were good.

I took some comparison shots earlier you could look at but pbase was screwing up and I couldn't post them for you. Its up now. Here is an example you can directly compare:

1X (35mm)



3X



6X



10X



12X (420mm)


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Old Jul 1, 2004, 6:22 AM   #9
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Hmmm....I was only parotting what a lot of people say out there. You will note I also said compact cameras.

I own a Nikon Coolpix 990, which give more manual control, then some SLRs out there....the masses still call it a point and shoot.


Hmmm...plus there is a whole range of range finders, and other cameras that do not fit the mold......


So I do apologize for keeping things too simple.
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