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Old Sep 22, 2002, 8:58 PM   #1
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Do all digital cameras record their images in 3 by 4 height to width ratios? So every time I want a 3x5 or a 4x6 print I will have to crop the image? Or do some cameras or settings make the image a 3 by 5 ratio?
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Old Sep 22, 2002, 9:37 PM   #2
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they generally follow the convention of a 35 mm image in ratio. there are certain cameras that offer panorama type views.
generally you shoot to crop and work from there.
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Old Sep 23, 2002, 1:06 AM   #3
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Of course cropping a digital image is pretty trivial.
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Old Sep 23, 2002, 8:09 AM   #4
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Cropping isn't so trivial when you think of the expensive sacrifice of ccd pixels, storage and processing time. I'd like all my camera pixels and hence resolution to be used in the output format. Most home cinema displays in future will be 16X9. Yes, you can crop to 16x9 if you've shot to protect, but you lose a lot of pixel resolution in the process!
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Old Sep 23, 2002, 9:13 AM   #5
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cinema shooting is done different ways to attain a 16:9 ratio.
1- it can be shot using a standard lens using a panaflex or arri 35 or 70mm camera. look thru the eyepiece and you will see different series of lines. these are called cutoff lines. that is the shooting area that must be used for the end product. 16:9, TV. all depends on the end product. film out side of these lines and it not in the picture at the end. thats cropping in the camera.
2- the big guns. anamorphic lenses. the image they film is 16:9 but thru the optics it squeezes the image on to 35 or 70 mm filmstock. it is then projected thru reverse anamorphic lens in the theater for your enjoyment.

the future is 16:9 and digital in cinema.it will take time for ther are only a few that actually shoot 16:9 native.

photography freezes that moment and allows the creator a greater latitude in size and shape of the image than the fixed screen of cinema. most photographers shoot to crop


remember that a digital or film stills not going to go much beyond a 11x14 on these type of cameras. if you want we can use fractal programs to up that as much as 600% lossless.

as to home theaters and 16:9. the current resolution on a 42 in flat panel is 1024x768 which is lower then that of my 17in monitor. there is a lot of processing and POV(persistance of vision) going on there. TV is pretty low resolution stuff no matter what. even HDTV is no where near the quality of a single digital photo image today. its a power/bandwidth issue.

its all a matter of perspectives.


[Edited on 9-23-2002 by sjms]
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Old Sep 23, 2002, 10:36 AM   #6
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SJMS, thanks for an excellent precis on 16X9. Having 'framing guidelines' (in UK we call them 'safe area' masks) is a good start. I'd like to see this in the higher end digicams.

It's true that anamorphic lenses can provide the optical compression for wider aspects. However, from film, you are starting with thousands more pixels (sorry halide crystals!), so can afford to lose some resolution.

I think the point of the earlier post was that image format doesn't exactly match output format of prints, and later will be influenced by new home displays. If you've watched 16X9 on plasma for a while, then 4X3 on the same display becomes less acceptable.

From a previous post I gather Kodak cams are nearer 16X9 then 4X3. I am told by creatives in TV that 16x9 is nearer to our natural viewing experience. I suppose in stills we have always cut and masked, even from 2x2, till it looks right, BUT there has always been sufficient resolution, limited by grain, compared to current ccd's.

[Edited on 9-23-2002 by voxmagna]
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