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Old Jul 23, 2004, 12:40 PM   #1
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i would like to know what are the differences btwn the dslr and the normal digital cameras.

what are the advantages and disadvantages of each

which one is better to have
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Old Jul 23, 2004, 4:03 PM   #2
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I will just give one advantage and one disadvantage (beside the obvious interchangeable lenses)

Pro: - DSLRs use large CCD or CMOS image sensors which mean larger individual pixels for more sensitivity (higher ISO) and less noise.

Con: - no image preview in LCD.

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Old Jul 23, 2004, 4:30 PM   #3
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Whichever ones fits your needs, is the one that is better to have.

Pros for DSLRsare:

1. larger sensor means less noise in low light conditions, or in higher ISO settings.

2. Higher ISO settings allow greater possibility to get that shot in low light.

3.Interchangeable lenses allow great versatility.

4. Lag time greatly diminished. Camera takes photo very quickly after shutter button depressed. Some top of the line compacts are equal to some DSLRs today in reduced lag time.

5. Awesome TTL viewing via viewfinder.

6. Greater battery life due to not having the back LCD on all the time as a viewfinder.

7. Greater and accurate % coverage of viewfinder for compositional purposes.

DSLR Cons are:

1. Bulky, heavy, and large cameras. Likewise, the more lenses and accessories you have, the heavier your load will be.

2. Pricier. Can buy body only, and they never come with a memory card. Extra lenses are the true cost. Some savings to be had with kit lens if offered.

3. Can't view using back LCD due to mirror blocking path. So LCD is used only once the shot is taken.

4. Moving mirror can cause blur, especially at the extremes of both focal ranges.

5. Weak built in flash, although seems to be more powerful then many compacts offer. on the flip side, the more you pay for your DSLR, the less there is a chance of having a built in flash included due to durability/weather proofing issues.

Now, compact Pros are:

1. Smaller, easier to carry.

2. In the top end models, lenses can be better then most DSLR lenses. Due to small sensor size, it is easier for manufacturers to build a faster lens. Thus, you can get some awesome lenses with awesome statistics built into a compact camera.

3. Can get larger resolution then many DSLRs. However, this comes at the cost of more noise.

4. Can have a full feature set of manual and program modes like the DSLRs.

5. Often, better at macro work then a DSLR unless you buy a good macro lens for the DSLR. However, out of the box, better then a DSLR.

6. Use back screen as live viewfinder.

7. Can be much cheaper then a DSLR. Some high end models can be more expensive then a low end DSLR.

Compact Cons are:

1. Eat batteries like there is no tomorrow due to LCD usage.

2. More noise, very poor for nighttime photography. Increase resolution comes at cost of image quality. This is a direct relationship to the sensor being smaller then DSLRs.

3. Offer less ISO settings.

4. No TTL viewfinder. Thus either must deal with the back LCD, the shortcomings of the glass viewfinder due to parallax error, or an electronic view finder if your model has one (This gives you TTL, but with some other problems like poor refresh rate, etc).

5. Often less featured then DSLRs. For example, plenty of models out there do not offer a hot shoe for external flash. Addition of filters and other accessories can be entertaining to use with many compact cameras.

6. Weak built in flash.

7. Can be less complicated in usage. However, the higher priced cameras can be complicated enough.

8. No versatility in lens. What you get is what you will have. Can be alleviated by use of attachment lenses on some models.



This is just a small list off the top of my head. Feel free to add anything else. I am sure I missed lots of other points.



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Old Jul 23, 2004, 9:32 PM   #4
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The biggest drawback of DSLRs is cost. The lenses are very expensive (for good ones). The advantages outlined above include reduced shutter lag and less noise as well as the flexibility those expensive lenses provide.

Keep in mind that money you spend on lenses can be carried forward to your next camera, as long as you stay in the same manufacturer's cameras.

It's not uncommon to spend as much on a lens as most folks spend on a point and shoot camera.
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Old Jul 23, 2004, 10:45 PM   #5
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They both have their place. Me I'm a standard Digicam user. Mostly because I really don't want to carry around a bunch of equipment and I enjoy the versitality of the consumer digicams. I also mainly print 8x10 and get very good results. I also use mostly the display to compose my images. I don't like to look through the viewfinder.

If I were a pro or a pro want-a-be (which I don't have the talent for) then a digital SLR would be the way I would go. I wouldn't think of going into something like a wedding with a normal digicam.
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Old Jul 24, 2004, 12:58 AM   #6
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Chako wrote:
Quote:
[snip]
Quote:
Compact Cons are:

1. Eat batteries like there is no tomorrow due to LCD usage.

[snip]
Quote:
1) Battery tech is vastly improved nowdays. The latest compacts have some great battery life. The life of my Kodak DX6490 was better than a Rebel 300D, A Pentax Optio 550 is pretty amazing and the new Minolta A1/A2 have grips that give it 1000+shot lifespans.

---------------------------
Additional features of the Compact camera

Because of the continuous sensor most have movie modes (not really worth it IMHO but it is there).

On many the back display can tilt/swivel which is a lot easier when taking strange angled shots.

Generally better out of the camera pictures.. DSLRs generally take a little more dedication and require post processing to get the pictures after you shoot. The final result is better pictures but it is an extra step.


-----------------------------
Additional features of DSLR

Usually better handling of latest memory tech. The best DSLR will write to memory 5-10x faster than a Compact camera.

Bigger internal memory (usually) so you can get more frames per second for a longer sustained time at the maximum resolution.

RAW support standard.. Some compact cameras (the "prosumer class") have this but most of the DSLR allow you to read the raw data directly from the focal plane and get more bits per pixeluncompressed data this can be part of the flow that was talked about above.
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Old Jul 24, 2004, 4:09 AM   #7
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I do weddings for a living and see many guests bring their latest and greatest digitals to the party. Everytime it's the same. I see them gather a group of people, aim their cameras, use the lcd monitor to frame, focus, focus, focus, focus... pre-flash goes off for a few seconds and shoot. After all that, I come in to grab my own shots for the bride and groom using my D100: aim, focus, recompose and shoot. Done. Everything is faster on a DSLR, as it should be. I know exactly where the image will be in focus, not a guessing game looking at a small screen. Not all DSLR's are created equal, and different lenses and external flashes make a difference in performance and image quality/clarity as well.
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Old Jul 24, 2004, 8:15 AM   #8
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marokero wrote:
Quote:
I do weddings for a living and see many guests bring their latest and greatest digitals to the party. Everytime it's the same. I see them gather a group of people, aim their cameras, use the lcd monitor to frame, focus, focus, focus, focus... pre-flash goes off for a few seconds and shoot. After all that, I come in to grab my own shots for the bride and groom using my D100: aim, focus, recompose and shoot. Done. Everything is faster on a DSLR, as it should be. I know exactly where the image will be in focus, not a guessing game looking at a small screen. Not all DSLR's are created equal, and different lenses and external flashes make a difference in performance and image quality/clarity as well.

Look at the difference between shots taken by a pro and those taken by most amateurs. The pro shots usually have natural expressions and true smiles. With Dewy Dimwit taking your picture you start with a smile, transition to a fake smile and often end up looking like a deer staring at oncoming headlights. It doesn't much matter whether Dewy bought a DSLR or P&S – he isn't ready to take the picture when he raises the camera.

I've taught the kids to make their best guess at composition and push the button as soon as they bring the camera to their eye. Fine tunes the composition and lower the camera. Say something funny about why you need another picture and shoot again as soon as you have the camera to your eye. With a built-in flash on a consumer camera you aren't going to get the quality of pictures taken with a DSLR and a good flash on a bracket, but you will at least get the natural expressions.

You can actually focus and frame pretty quickly with some of the flagship prosumer cameras with manual zoom and focus rings. The EVF on the A2 is starting to become a decent tool, and if you zoom the center of the frame you can focus OK if you don't trust the auto-focus. All you really have to do is frame and check the focus indicator to make sure it is focused on the subject. Put a good flash on a bracket and you are close to DSLR quality. DSLR shots pop out at you with their low noise and great dynamic range, but you can post process a prosumer image to where it is close if you shoot raw or at least with minimum contrast and sharpening.

EVFs are a love/hate thing with me. After a lifetime of film SLRs the first look through an EVF was disappointing to say the least. But I have learned that EVFs have a lot to offer. You are seeing the image as the CCD sees it. For a grab shot, if it looks good in the EVF it is probably OK. You have more information available like the histogram and focus point indicator.
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Old Jul 24, 2004, 10:12 AM   #9
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Monza76Con: - no image preview in LCD.



I dont know if this is such a con really, I have got used to it again and I really feel it is easier to shoot better photos in this manner.


Chako, >>>>Pricier. Can buy body only, and they never come with a memory card. Extra lenses are the true cost. Some savings to be had with kit lens if offered.>>>>>>



I must have been very lucky when I got my DSLR recently, came with a standard lens up to 135m I think and I had thrown in a 90 to 300mm lens and two uv filters to protect my lenses and free cleaning of lenes anytime and somephoto paper.All this for
2,299.00 or in American dollars
1,639.42 USD

I dont know if you would class this as cheap but in Australia things are not that cheap anyway.

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Old Jul 24, 2004, 10:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CastleDude
Generally better out of the camera pictures.. DSLRs generally take a little more dedication and require post processing to get the pictures after you shoot. The final result is better pictures but it is an extra step.
While this is generally true, I wanted to point out that most (all?) DSLRS have adjustable settings for contrast, sharpness, and saturation. This allows you to get basically the same level of "right out of the camera" shots than a prosumer or point and shoot all-in-one will do. Of course, you'll loose the ability to makes some post-processing changes while retaining the quality (once you put sharpness in, it's difficult to get out without looking worse.)

Eric
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