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Old Aug 16, 2004, 5:52 AM   #1
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Hi could someone pls tell me what settings (shutter, aperture, iso etc) they use when clicking pics on a rainy day (i.e. to get the falling rain).

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Old Aug 16, 2004, 11:25 AM   #2
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Probably one of the best approaches would be to just try some shots at various settings and see what you like. Since light varies a great deal, even in a rainfall, someone else's settings would have little relevency to what you are shooting.

One thing Hollywood does when shooting rain is to back light it to make it standout. Of course those are controlled situations.

The best way to learn is to make images and see what you want to change to make them better. That's one of the great benefits of digital photography, instant feedback.
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Old Aug 16, 2004, 9:45 PM   #3
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is it even possible to put a camera on a window ledge and take a pic, and get perfectly crisp drops of water during the rain? wouldnt the rain drops be too small or too fast for the camera to focus on?
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Old Aug 17, 2004, 1:05 AM   #4
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Thanks Deane. Redman thats exactly what i was wondering :-)
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Old Aug 17, 2004, 8:45 AM   #5
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Yes it is possible. However, you will have to have several things going for you.

1. A fast shutter speed to get that stop action.

2. A flash gun or strobe light.

What your looking at to get those perfectly crisp raindrops howeveris a studio setting, with some strobes, a black background, and some fairly expensive camera gear. This is called High speed photography. If you have a really fast motor drive, then you can get nice things like a sequential photo set of a raindrop, etc...

With that stated though, you can get very good results if you practice, and experiment, with your equipment you have now. If your shutter speed is high enough, then you can freeze water going over a waterfall. The raindrops are just a bit more challenging to get, but you can.


Edit: I forgot to mention that a simple house shower will give you all the practice you need, even in fair weather. Just explain to your spouse before you do this...cough.
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Old Aug 17, 2004, 1:47 PM   #6
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my camera is capable of a shutter speed as fast as 1/2000th of a sec...is that fast enough for what you're saying to do?
if not, how fast should it be?

im gonna try this next time it rains, if you do the same tyrone, post some pics and we can compare results and settings...
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Old Aug 17, 2004, 8:12 PM   #7
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Do you mean like this?

Nikon D-100

Raw converted to jpg.

Nikon 80-200 lens @ 200mm

1/90 @ f8

ISO 200

W/B cloudy

Strobe on lit up tulip.

Good Luck Dale

http://www.pbase.com/cowboy43
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Old Aug 18, 2004, 1:05 AM   #8
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Sure Redman i will definitely try this out with my A80. Beautiful shot cowboy. So it is possible then..................:-)
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