Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 19, 2004, 12:31 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 21
Default

Im planning on buying a new Digital Camera, What is a UV filter for them and should I buy one? I heard it protects your lens?
rayf is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 19, 2004, 1:16 PM   #2
Moderator
 
calr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 8,466
Default

This is a frequently asked question. A UV filter is an essentially clear piece of glass. It reduces the amount of uv rays the reach the film or digital element. The visible effect is minimal with a slight reduction in haze.

The more important use of a uv filter is, as you said, to protect the front element of the lens. It costs far less to replace a damaged or scratched filter than to replace/repair a damaged lens. I keep uv filters on all my lenses.

Cal Rasmussen
calr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 19, 2004, 8:17 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

And to give you an opposing view, I only put a filter on my lens when I'm in conditions that warrant the use of a filter. My feeling is that it's just one more piece of glass between your subject and your sensor. While I understand why so many people feel the security of having a "protective" filter, I don't think it's necessary. There have been many heated arguments over the pros and cons of using a filter and I have no idea which side is correct. It's my choice to not use a "protective" filter as a matter of routine.
ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 20, 2004, 6:47 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Mikefellh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,707
Default

You didn't say which camera you're getting, so I'll cover the angle of non-dSLRs:

On many cameras that have extending lens barrels, a filter tube adapter is also required to use a UV filter...the tube and filter makes for a more protected camera, as it's easy to bump the lens barrel out of alignment on these cameras.

As well, when the lens extends/retracts the camera "breathes" sucking in dust in the evironment...with a tube and UV filter in place, you are keeping outside dust out.

I never take my UV/tube off...unless I'm using another filter or lens.

Note, many lower-end cameras have no ability to add a filter or lens.
Mikefellh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 20, 2004, 7:55 PM   #5
maw
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 29
Default

On the Nikon 18-70 lens that comes with the D70 do you to use a thin UV lens or will the standard thickness UV work OK. Can the lens hood still be attached with either UV lens?



Thanks in advance,



Mike
maw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 20, 2004, 9:43 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 430
Default

ohenry worte:

Quote:
My feeling is that it's just one more piece of glass between your subject and your sensor.* While I understand why so many people feel the security of having a "protective" filter, I don't think it's necessary.
If one IS going to use a "protective" filter, then it realy pays to invest in a one that is of the highest quality; optically flat and multicoated (both surfaces), and if used in conjungtion with a wide angle lens, then in addition, the filter (mounting ring) should be physically thin to avoid vignetting. It just doesn't pay to use a cheap filter to in front of an expensive lens. Uncoated filters will lose ~4% light transmission at each air-glass interface due to reflection which not only results in a reduction of lens speed (increasint the f stop) but can also result in nasty lens "flare". Filters made from poor quality glass (or ..gag.. plastic) can also introduce image distortions.

All that being said, I use (B&W and Hoya) UV/skylight filters to protect the front element when I know that I am in a situation where I don't want to be overly careful and protective of the camera/lens. In more controlled situations I take the filter(s) off--after all, that's why they put the threads on them in the first place, isn't it?

Anyway, as ohenry says, using a filter for protection is a choice, not a rule.
jawz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2004, 5:59 PM   #7
maw
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 29
Default

Thanks for the replies. I've noticed on ebay and other sites that Hoya has different versions of the UV and polarizer filters. I know the Pro 1 series are way out of my budjet. What would be the difference between a multi coated, HMC and Super HMC Hoya UV filter and a standard , HMC and Super HMC polarizer.



Thanks for the help,



Mike
maw is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:03 PM.