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Old Aug 30, 2004, 4:17 PM   #1
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:?just wondering who the dslr users are, and what sort of photos you shoot? are most of you photographers or just for fun?
just i think the prices are quite high and was curious to see what kind of people use dslr cameras.

thanks
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 4:36 PM   #2
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I use a Nikon D100 and shoot just about anything BUT people. I like to shoot landscapes, flowers, architecture, abstracts, still lifes, etc. This past weekend, I went to the Oregon State Fair and shot a bunch of night shots of carnival rides in the midway. Some of these are posted in the "Other Photos" forum. I have been doing quite a bit of macro shooting recently, still trying to figure out best how to light macro subjects.

I am not a professional although at this point I probably could be. I am what most would consider advanced amateur. In the past year I have shot over 4000 digital photos. Add to that over 300 rolls of 35mm color negative film and about 50 rolls of color slide film and I have quite a collection of photos.

I have just bought a Hitachi 2gb Microdrive and plan to make good use of it in Hawaii next week.

Cal Rasmussen
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 4:48 PM   #3
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What a strange question! Of course professionals use DSLR's and so do amateurs who like REAL photography. You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, nor can you take excellent photos with a point and shoot camera. Good ones yes, but with technique, experience, knowledge and application an enthusiast will in any profession or hobby go for the best material for the job. Does Tiger Woods buy his clubs at the discount store, or Michael Jordan his trainers at Walmart?

As for the photographs DSLR users take, well, the world is their oyster. Underwater or of the stars, action or still life, macro or telephoto, it doesn't matter as long as the objective is achieved.

If money was the only criterium, we would all drive around in Japanese superminis, shop at Walmart, drink and eat the most anodyne things, but then there are always those whostrive to excel and will pay good money to achieve better photos, drive faster, run better, catch bigger fish, sail faster and so on.

If you think DSLR prices are high, compare them to DSLR prices 4 years back, or SLR prices 10 years back; lenses too.You'll be glad you are - perhaps - considering a purchase today and not then.
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 5:28 PM   #4
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I've been shooting SLR pictures for over 25 years and digital SLR's the last year. I currently own a Canon 10D and DRebel. I shoot mainly nature and landscape photography, strictly for my own pleasures.

The basic cost of the dSLR body is only the beginning of the expenses involved in this hobby.
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 5:53 PM   #5
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I have a Canon 10D and I shoot for myself right now. I'm slowly building up a portfolio that I hope to eventually sell.

I shoot animals, birds mostly but also other animals. I have done some landscapes, but I don't have a good eye for them.

Eric
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 5:55 PM   #6
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ohenry wrote:
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The basic cost of the dSLR body is only the beginning of the expenses involved in this hobby.

ohenry is so right, it is unbelivable!

once you get a dslr, say good by to all your money, you will buy so many EXPENSIVE add-ones (that are needed to take pictures) i thought "ok, $1500 for a camera, thats not bad, im only buying it once, i wont need anything else" man was i wrong! for whatever reason, ive payed $1,000 for 1 lens, yes one lens! (a buddy of mine that shoots a dslr payed $4,500 for one! But thats not bad when you consider he payed $4,000 for his camera! And i have a $400 cf card, yes A card, not more than one, but one! ive also spent $350 for a flash!! I thought that was the end, but no, i went and bought a $90 monopod! a piece of carbon fiber, and i paid $90! Then i needed room to store all my pictures, time for a new $200 harddrive. How about a $80 camera case that looks like a backpack!

i could go on and on, but i dont want to sit here and type, if you want to get a dslr, be ready to spend lots of money...
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 7:12 PM   #7
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cameranserai wrote:
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What a strange question! Of course professionals use DSLR's and so do amateurs who like REAL photography. You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, nor can you take excellent photos with a point and shoot camera.
Hogwash! A good photographer can take excellent photos with any camera. It takes much more than the best equipment to make the great photographer! Using your logic, only golfers using the same clubs as Tiger Woods can compete at his professional level (despite the fact that neither him nor Michael Jordan pay anything for their gear)!
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 7:31 PM   #8
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It's not the camera that takes the picture. It's the nut behind the camera.

It's kind of like computers. Cameras faithfully do what you tell them to. If you don't tell them what to do, you get bad or mediocre pictures. GIGO! Garbage in, garbage out. It applies to both computers and cameras.
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Old Aug 30, 2004, 10:17 PM   #9
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Any camera? c'mon Kaylspo get real.. If all cams were the same we would buying them for a $1 and then going for the next one. Go buy a disbosible and get the shots you do.. You sound like Hemingway when he said "all is needed is a pencil and a little luck" ( I agree with the luck)...sure you have to have a bit of an eye to be a photog.. but the technology sure helps to learn..Sure, was Lipmons photos great, yes, Ansels yes, but imagine what they could do with todays technology.. knowing how to use the most recent advancments is part of the game.. If you don't you will be left behind.. Any Cam ? Show me!! and I will stand corrected!!

Dale


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Old Aug 30, 2004, 10:58 PM   #10
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Kalypso is absolutely right! I have taken some outstanding shots with a disposable. I own two digital cameras, a Nikon D100 and a Minolta S414. The Nikon takes outstanding pictures...most of the time. The minolta also takes outstanding pictures...most of the time. The difference is that with the Nikon and all its computer wizardry, bells, and whistles, it is much easier to control what gets recorded on memory card. The Minolta, on the other hand, doesn't have as good a control system. Its auto-focus system is poor and manual focus is virtually impossible to use. The LCD screen is worthless in bright sunlight. However, if I show it who's boss, it also takes outstanding pictures.

The Nikon cost $1400. The Minolta cost $400. Both take excellent pictures WHEN SETUP PROPERLY. Both are capable of taking very bad pictures. My point is, YOU are the one who determines how good the pictures can be. Composition is extremely important to a good picture. Lighting is extremely important. These two factors hold true for ANY camera. With that disposable camera, you don't have a zoom lens so you have to move around to get the composition. You also have to move around to find the best lighting.

Bottom line...You are the one who makes the picture. The camera is only a tool. I have seen some excellent wood carvings made with a chainsaw. I have also seen some excellent wood carvings made with very expensive carving knives. The tools help with the finished product but ultimately it is the user of the tools that determines what the finished product will look like.



Cal Rasmussen


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