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Old Sep 9, 2004, 9:57 PM   #1
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Do Steve and the Imaging Resource Comparometer take all of their sample pictures using a tripod? If so, does this make results more difficult to interpret for handheld use?

Some of the complaints re: the Sony P100,for example,seem to revolve around incorrect auto shutter control resulting in more blurry images from subtle hand motion, if I understand correctly.....

Of course, I can understand the need for a standard to compare image quality and take out a random factor like hand motion, but I just wonder how this translates to real everyday use.....

Thanks in advance!
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Old Sep 10, 2004, 8:40 AM   #2
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That's an interesting question and I would have no idea, but it could be an important factor. Why not mail Steve and ask him?If I was reviewing I would to ensure it was purely the camera and not the amount ofshake I had on the day in question.

I had five cameras onhome trial earlier this year when I was upgrading. I shot test images of the same subject with eachand used a tripod every time.

I now have a Sony P12 which is really the 5MP predecessor of the P100/120/150 range. It is almost as small and when I first started using it I noticed you did need to ensure a steady shooting grip due to its small size...compared to a slightly larger and heavier make/model.

If you use much zoom in anything other than bright light some sort of support is soon useful. I look for trees, walls or buildings etcif it's too far to go for the tripod.

Also the far left lens position on these cameras isn't the best position for getting a good grip with your left hand....it gets in the way.

David
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Old Sep 10, 2004, 12:04 PM   #3
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The handshake issue in one that's suffered by ALL cameras if the person taking the picture goes beyond the limits of photography. For instance shooting handheld at less than 1/30th with a normal lens, or shooting at long zooms with less than required shutter speed (the rule is 1/(35mm focal length)...if you zoom to 300mm, you should be at 1/300th for a handheld shot).

Looking at the DSC-P100 that you mentioned, it's a tiny camera with nothing to hold onto and very little weight...not a good combination. On the one hand people want pocketable lightweight cameras, but when it comes to picture taking something larger with some bulk is better.

You can't have it both ways.

People expect digital cameras (since they have computers and Auto modes) to be perfect, but if you go beyond the limits of photography you're going to get poor results.
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Old Sep 11, 2004, 2:58 AM   #4
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Looking at the DSC-P100 that you mentioned, it's a tiny camera with nothing to hold onto and very little weight...not a good combination. On the one hand people want pocketable lightweight cameras, but when it comes to picture taking something larger with some bulk is better.

Yep ideally a heavy large camera will give better results, I'm happy to admit my P12 suffers the disadvantages you mention.

You can't have it both ways. People expect digital cameras (since they have computers and Auto modes) to be perfect, but if you go beyond the limits of photography you're going to get poor results.

Again I agree, folks often expect far to much from digicams. My impression about their greatest false expectation revolves round low light indoor shots. There are loads of complaints here which, when examined, are all about the same issue....not enough light.

But when you understand the issues the results from very small cameras like mine and the P100 don't have to be poor.

As long as you have the basic photographic rules in your head, and an appreciation of light, then it is possible to take steps that will ensure pretty well 100% goodresults.

For these small Sonys........

You need always to take a second to ensure you are standing properly. If you havethe wrist strap on and itis quite tight then it will be tensioned as you hold the camera in the shooting position. The left hand still needs to grip the camera firmly despite the nuisance of the far left lens position that gets in the way. A thumb and forefinger grip is needed. Some folks seem to "dip" their whole hand as they push the shutter button.....you need to make sure the shutter finger is moving completely separately as you release.

As soon as the light is less than bright avoid using anything other than very modest zoom. If you have to use zoom, or the light falls right offin a non-flash situationthen look for something to rest the camera on...... or brace your upperbody against something.

Personally I use the LCD for framing 99% of the time but you do get a firmer brace against your own body if the viewfinder is used with the camera held firmly to the forehead.

After a short while all this is second nature and enables perfect results.

David


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Old Sep 12, 2004, 4:28 PM   #5
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Thanks Cybershot455and Mikefellh!

I just put in my order for a new P150. Looking forward to it!!
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Old Sep 13, 2004, 2:01 PM   #6
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Mikefellh wrote:
Quote:
The handshake issue in one that's suffered by ALL cameras if the person taking the picture goes beyond the limits of photography. ...
You can't have it both ways.

People expect digital cameras (since they have computers and Auto modes) to be perfect, but if you go beyond the limits of photography you're going to get poor results.
Just a quibble - I agree that perfect focus, beautiful lighting, great composition, etc. are worthy goals and require suitable techniques. But handheld, even at the ragged edges of the camera, is not "beyond the limits of photography", IMHO. An example - I was at a Golden Gloves boxing match at a nearby convention center. The light was minimal, the crowd jostling, but I shot anyway, handheld VERY near the ring (sweat hitting me ... almost). (1 MP digital Kodak, and of course, no flash). A friend describes the technique as "drive-by shooting", although mine was more "walk-by". The shots were blurry, but caught the action nicely, and the single source (pretty much) light from above added to the drama. IMHO.

Again, I agree with your point, but the exception proves the rule.
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