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Old Oct 14, 2004, 1:14 AM   #1
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After researching digital cameras for a few months, there are some things I know, and some things I don't know.

One of the things I don't know is why I have yet to find a digital camera with multiple exposure capability. Is it possible to have multiple exposures on one 'frame' in a digital camera? Ifmultiple exposureis possible, why aren't there any cameras that offer it? If multiple exposures are not possible, why not?

Thanks for any insights given.
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Old Oct 14, 2004, 5:19 AM   #2
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You can do a much better combination of multiple exposures in post-editing! :idea:
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Old Oct 14, 2004, 7:22 AM   #3
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While technically it is (unless someone else knows something I don't) possible to do a multiple exposure shot with a digital camera it is pointless to add that feature. The reason I say pointless is because unlike film cameras the image is captured digitally and can easly be uploaded to a PC and edited giving the photographer more options than would be possible with filters.
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Old Oct 14, 2004, 8:00 AM   #4
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FYI (technically)

http://www.kodak.com/global/plugins/...Operations.pdf

-> There's several issues:
1. One need to reset the sensor for each shot and allow the photons to charge up the photo diodes.
2. The charges are required to be read out quicky before they dissipate (or become residual which need to be reset)
3. Odd and even rows on some sensors have different integration time...


The larger problem however is unless the camera is a dSLR, the image captured is immediately erased so that the same sensor can be used to capture 'live' for the viewfinder either to the EVF or the rear LCD screen for the next shot! :?
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Old Oct 14, 2004, 6:53 PM   #5
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I can do it on my Fuji S602z.
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Old Oct 15, 2004, 1:23 AM   #6
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Yeah - I was playing with a Fuji S-7000 today in a store and just discovered its multiple exposure capability. Once ME is set, you simply take the photo, and this photo is displayed, with options at the bottom: NEXT (meaning next photo to layer onto the existing one), CANCEL, (meaning cancel last photo), CANCEL ALL, and one other option I don't recall. I don't know if there's a limit to the number of multiple exposures (I did up to 4 or 5 without problem in the store).

As for loading the photos onto a computer and playing with the images and overlaying via some software, I'd rather not. Call me 'old fashioned', but doing things that way strikes me as being too easy. As a professional photographer once told me: "A picture used to be proof that something happened. Today, with all the editing and computer manipulations possible, a picture doesn't prove a damned thing."

I'm as much of a 'purist' as a person willing to go digital can be. For example, in all of the test prints I've had done, I've told them not to mess with anything - to make no color or brightness or contrast 'corrections' when printing - just print it as it is, in its original form. Once I receive the print, I always check to make sure there are only a bunch of zeros on the back of the paper. I figure if I screw up the exposure, I don't deserve a good photo.The fact that Idon't allow any 'bail out' of my mistakeshelps me to get the exposure right.

Multiple Exposures within a camera is one thing.While it is a 'trick' of sorts, itstill requires skill in composing the images, etc. Creating Multiple Exposures via software simply seems to add a further element of impurity to the circumstance.

Besides - don't you lose resolution (and thus quality) every time a J-PEG photo is edited? As I understand it, one would have to shoot in RAW or TIFF mode to be able to retain high resolution and quality after editing. I would want to print some of these Multiple Exposure shots, and so don't wish to lose any quality (resolution) through editing.
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Old Oct 15, 2004, 1:36 AM   #7
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EOS RT wrote:
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Besides - don't you lose resolution (and thus quality) every time a J-PEG photo is edited? As I understand it, one would have to shoot in RAW or TIFF mode to be able to retain high resolution and quality after editing.
No, IF when editing you save the image into the program's native or TIFF formats. You only go back to JPG in your final save (if JPG is required)...that way the loss is very minor! Whenever you load the JPG into the computer, it is uncompressed, so saves in non-lossy formats would prevent further loss.
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Old Oct 15, 2004, 5:03 AM   #8
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As far as 'purist' go, let's take a look shall we?

1. The camera is not taking multiple exposures: it "photoshops" the pictures for you internally albeit with a rather limited processing power and restricted option.

2. The reason folks use RAW is to by-pass the 'in-cameras' processing because their output are only 8-bit, whether it's a jpeg or tiff image. The RAW files preserve the full 12/14-bit resolution of the sensor for the images to be processed with the full 32-bit floating point arithmetic power of an external PC (couple that with the choice of many excellent RAW converters). At this point you'll also have the option to save 16-bit tiff files which you can't with the diminutive CPU of the camera! :?

3. When you let the camera do its 'trick' you are allowing the camera to merge several 8-bit images (which were already rounded off by the camera during its prior processings) with no control whatsoever over the pictures (and through another round of round-off again) :shock:

4. IMO the multiple images processed by the PC with all the overiding controls over the images are what a 'purist' might want and not what the camera crunch out -> just check the corresponding file sizes.
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Old Oct 16, 2004, 7:55 PM   #9
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Actually, NHL, I know what I want and don't want, and what is acceptable to me, as well as what is not. I don't possess your knowledge of the technicalities - and that's fine with me. I know nothing about 8 bit vs. 16 bit, etc. - and I've no interest in learning about it at this point. Simply, I would like to use a digital camera in a manner which most closely resembles the way I have used a 35 mm SLR for the past several years. Thanks for the technicalinformation, though - it may come in handy at a later point.

Sitting down in front of a computer and manipulating images is simply not my idea of photography. I'm aware of some of the things that are possible with computer manipulation via Photoshop and other software, and it doesn't appeal to me in the least. Regardless of how a digital camera processes pictures, I am still in control of exposure - that is, the exposure is determined via my shutter/aperture settings on the camera, and not viaa convenient sliding dial that I move with a mouse on my computer monitor.In the end, multiple exposures in a digicam work in the same way that they work in a 35 mm SLR - that is, two or more images are layered on top of one another, with the shutter and aperture settings having a major influence on the image.That's as much 'technology' as I'll accept in this area at this point.

So, all things considered, I'd like to find a camera which possesses the features I want, including a Multiple Exposure option.


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Old Oct 17, 2004, 10:16 PM   #10
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Someone who wants control over their images will do their own processing, beit chemical or digital. That is the way the best photographers in the past and present have done it.

Although I am not a lawyer, it is my imparession that a photo has never proved anything more than a pencil sketch does. They have never been anything but a visual aid: it is the testimony of someone who can be cross examined that counts.
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