Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 20, 2004, 11:15 AM   #1
htb
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 15
Default

We got our A80 earlier this summer and so far have only used it in warm weather. With the winter fast approaching (we live in Canada), I'm just wondering if there are any risks, or any precautions to be taken, when carrying or operating a digital camera outdoors in sub-zero temperature.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
htb is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 20, 2004, 12:08 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
billy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Ohio USA
Posts: 1,733
Default

Look at the specifications inSteve's review or in the camera's owner manual for "Operating Temperatures". As long as you are inside of those parameters, I don't see a problem. Good luck!

:|
billy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2004, 12:27 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 30
Default

check the manual, I doubt even canadian winters will hurt it, but as with all electronics, when going from cold to warm (outside to inside) it would be wise not to use the camera until the temp has equalized as condensation can/will form on and inside the camera.

Battery power in freezing temperatures will be reduced, keep the spare in an inside pocket of your jacket or pants, the warmer thebetter
gruss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2004, 2:32 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Mikefellh's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Toronto, ON, Canada
Posts: 1,707
Default

Most camera specs say not to use the cameras below freezing, but people do it all the time.

If your camera uses NiMH's, you will lose capacity in no time; either get some lithiums, or an external lithium-ion battery pack. If your camera already uses internal lithium-ion battery, you're all set.

The worst problem is bringing in the camera from a cold envrionment to a warm one...bring a air tight bag with you, and when you are about to go in get some COLD air into the bag (DON'T breathe into it), put the camera in, and seal it up. Now allow the camera to warm up to room temperature inside the bag. This is to prevent moisture from condensing on the camera and its electronics (electronic devices have short themselves out when this proceedure wasn't done in Alaska winters).
Mikefellh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2004, 9:49 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 5,803
Default

I wanted to second Mikefellh comment about moisture.
It is a real problem and should be taken seriously.

Cold air has less moisture in it than warm air. So if you store the camera in a bag of cold air then as it warms up there will be no moisture in the bag to condense on it.

Eric
eric s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2004, 11:07 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
aladyforty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6,964
Default

A friend of mine went to Alaska, It was very cold and she found that if she put her small digital down the front of her clothes near her skin it worked fine but it would not work at all if she kept it out. She had probs with the film camera she had with her as well.
aladyforty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 20, 2004, 11:16 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

the only real issues are the battery and the screen on the back.

depending on the formulation of the battery. NiMh does not do too well under -5 deg C. to alleviate that issue is to carry a second set of batteries and swap them out when the temp gets to them and warm them up in your pocket. Li Ion batteries do better in more extreme conditions. DO NOT get into the habit of keeping the camera warm under you jacket and bringing it out to shoot. in an outer pocket is ok. by keeping it close to your body, moisture from your body,will build up in the camera and then when you whip it in and out into the cold it can/will condense in and on the camera which may or may not not cause immediate problems but over time it may cause issues.

the monitoron the back in cold temps may become slow to react and even go inop in more extreme conditions. warming it will bring it back to life. in short in the real cold don't depend on it.
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 21, 2004, 7:21 AM   #8
Member
 
The Doctor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 78
Default

We just had a presentation on steam locomotives in China at our Camera Club in Rochester. Pete had gone to China three different times and is going again this spring and is taking his daughter. He goes in the winter because it improves how you see the steam. He takes three film cameras and shoots slides. He says a few people on the trips have brought digital cameras and they all fail in the 20 below weather.
The Doctor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 21, 2004, 7:28 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

yep. i still use my F5 and OM cameras for extreme conditions.
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 21, 2004, 8:49 AM   #10
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,547
Default

sjms wrote:
Quote:
yep. i still use my F5 and OM cameras for extreme conditions.
I picked up a used F5 last X-mas... Man what a TANK! :-)
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:40 PM.