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Old Nov 9, 2004, 4:56 AM   #1
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Hi people,

I am a color blind Panasonic FZ-10 user.

I am red/green color blind. It is very difficult to explain what this means to me. I can differentiate between most colors if the are close to prime. However I find it almost impossible to tell the difference between shades of green/red/brown and I find skin tones very difficult. A practical example of is that if I play golf and use red tees, I will almost never find them in the grass!

This of course causes issues with post processing if digital photos, particularly in sorting the saturations etc. One solution is to ask someone else what the colors look like, but in my experience this means that they'll suggest changes that, to me, adversly affect the image. I know that if the pics are just for me then I should leave them as I see fit, but if I'm posting pics, I'd rather not post them with odd colors. I also don't really want to take B+W pics.

There must be plenty of people out there with the same issues (and they'll mostly be blokes!), how do you deal with this?

TimS
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Old Nov 9, 2004, 7:49 AM   #2
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Just a thought - could you build up some sort of reference chart for basic values, by sampling say, skin tones. Then use the RGB numbers to check against ?

If that is feasible - you could then move into the more difficult areas and develop your own checklist of key values.

It is hard to visualize your problem, but I know it is much more common than many people realize.

I hope you get some first hand feedback - it is an interesting problem.

Best of luck.
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Old Nov 9, 2004, 10:30 AM   #3
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Here is an article that may be of interest. It was written by a Chris Nicholson,a photographer with eyes that are insensitive to the red/green areas of the spectrum (which seems to be yourissue).

He shows how touse RGB Values to color correctphotos in this two part article titled Even a colorblind person can color-correct a photo -or- How to correct your color using RGB values:

http://www.nicholsonprints.com/Articles/colorblind.htm

According to his web site, he's worked as a Freelance Photographer since 1994, with his work appearing inTennis Magazine, Golf Digest, USTA Magazine, The New York Times, Tennis Industry, Fairfield County Magazine, Pan Am Clipper, The Hartford Courant, The Connecticut Post and other newspapers. Chris' pro tennis photos were included in the 2002 book US Open Unmatched.

http://www.nicholsonprints.com/About.htm

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Old Nov 9, 2004, 3:08 PM   #4
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JimC emailed me today to suggest that I take a look at this forum thread, as he thought I might have something useful to add. As Jim mentioned, I'm a working photographer, and I'm also red-green color blind.

I used to think that I'd never be able to make my own prints because I wouldn't be able to make color corrections using filters, etc., in a darkroom. Then digital imaging came along. Even after getting a scanner and a printer, I still had to ask friends to double-check my work. But once I learned how to use RGB values to remove color casts by using Curves, suddenly I could correct on my own. Sometimes I still have to ask someone to check a particularly difficult correction for me, but for the most part I'm okay.

Jim has already told you about my article on color-correction for the color-blind. In that article I explain the basics of how I do my color corrections. (And color-correcting using RGB values and Curves is not just for color-blind people. The point is that doing color corrections digitally is so easy that even color-blind people can do them. It's another testament to the wonders of computers.)

One other tool I sometimes use is the software WhatColor. It runs in the background and will tell you the color and shade of anything you hover over with the cursor. Sometimes I use it to check that the sky in a photo is really blue, and not some slight shade of purple that I'm not seeing. You can learn more about WhatColor at http://www.hikarun.com/e/.

As far as correcting images for skin tones, the best tip I ever heard was from a PhotoShop guru named Ben Wilmore. His idea (which I've tried, and it works nicely) is to get a stock book with a sample CD from a stock agency. You can usually get one for free if you call and ask (I got mine -- a Corbis book -- from an art director I work with who gets them in the mail about once a month). When you need to adjust for a skin tone, flip throughthe book and find a photo of a person with the same skin tone as in your photo. Open the corresponding stock image sample on the CD, take an RGB reading, and then correct your photo accordingly. (The key to making this trick work well is to ensure the brightness levels of the two images are comparable.)

If you have any other questions, eitherpost them here (I'll track the thread), or feel free to email me. You can reach me pretty easily through my website, NicholsonPrints.com.

Good luck.

--Chris Nicholson
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Old Nov 10, 2004, 2:11 PM   #5
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Avery big THANK YOU to simpoman for raising this issue, another one to JimC for the links, and another one to ChrisN for his advice and information. Great site Chris, it may help to reduce the number of times I have to say "Does that look alright ?" to my wife.

Many thanks,

Stevekin.

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Old Nov 10, 2004, 6:53 PM   #6
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Many thanks Chris,

I have played with photoshop briefly and followed your guide, seems very straightforward. Tried to do it in PaintshopPro 8 and havent yet foundthe equivalent (albeit with a very brief effort!)

Could you clarifysomething for me.....if I take the B+W point measurements and they are 0,0,0 and 255,255,255 then its fair forme to assume that the colours in the image are natural? Is it not possible to haveblack 'black and white 'white'but to still have a colour cast with the shades in between? I apologise if this is a stupid question!

I really didnt think that this post would be so useful, I just wanted to see how other people dealt with the problem. Thanks so much for the advice.

The question I get asked the most, that makes me want to poke peoples eye out more than any other , is......'how do you cope with traffic lights?'......I just sigh, raise my eyes and point out that 'stop' is at the top and 'go' is at the bottom! And in any case traffic lights in the UK aren't red-amber-green.....they're red, yellow (probably, but definately not red or white) and white :lol:.

By the way, I work with a colour blind girl....now that's rare, and her birthday is the same date as mine (spooky!)

TimS
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Old Nov 10, 2004, 7:28 PM   #7
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simpoman wrote:
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By the way, I work with a colour blind girl....now that's rare...
Why? Is it a sex-linked gene?
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Old Nov 10, 2004, 7:45 PM   #8
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Yup... over 80% of color-blind people are males.
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Old Nov 13, 2004, 8:36 AM   #9
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8% - 12% of males of European origin and about one-half of 1% of females are colour blind, and we get it from our Mother !!.......................Thanks Mum.




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Old Nov 17, 2004, 10:18 PM   #10
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Stevekin wrote:
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8% - 12% of males of European origin and about one-half of 1% of females are colour blind, and we get it from our Mother !!.......................Thanks Mum.

*

*
If I'm not wrong, a color blind lady would have gotten it from both parents (father is also color blind, and mother is either color blind or gene carrier).

The guys have a harder deal, if your mom is color blind, you'll be color blind, and if your mom is a carrier, 50-50 chance. Nothing to do with dad.

Something to do with the X-chromosome.

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