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Old Oct 22, 2002, 2:38 PM   #1
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Default TIFF vs JPG - Please Help

I am shooting with a Sony F717 and need practical advice on the use of TIFF vs JPG modes. I understand the technical differences between TIFF and JPG - however, what are the practical differences when one wishes to print out at 8"x10" size? I will do minimal Photoshop alterations. Is there any significant practical visual difference in the print made from these two file formats? Obviously I am concerned about the time (not the file size) required for the camera to store the TIFF vs the JPG - it is significant when shooting non-stationary targets. Please help with any advice you can.
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Old Oct 22, 2002, 3:43 PM   #2
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The quality of pic will be minimal. Your camera will produce excellent photos with the JPG setting. If you were shooting professional portraits then TIFF might be a better choice.
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Old Oct 22, 2002, 4:26 PM   #3
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Most likely you would be hard pressed to be able to tell the difference between a TIFF and a low compression JPEG, but you should shoot some tests to see if that is true for your camera and your eye.
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Obviously I am concerned about the time (not the file size) required for the camera to store the TIFF vs the JPG - it is significant when shooting non-stationary targets
How does the motion of target (subject?) effect the time to store an image?
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Old Oct 22, 2002, 4:38 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew
How does the motion of target (subject?) effect the time to store an image?
It doesn't - however if a subject is in motion then one may not be able to acquire subsequent shots because by the time the camera has stored one TIFF image the subject might well have moved too much to acquire another.
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Old Oct 23, 2002, 10:10 AM   #5
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All cams have a variable amount of built in cache memory. Take a TIFF file, the cam does less work on processing, but the cam buffer will fill quickly and wait, since it is unlikely the cache size will be big enough to take the image in one go. Not sure, but some of the image storage may come from the CCD itself.

The cams buffer can only empty at a rate the (relatively slow) flash card can write. When the cams ccd arrays are read and the cams buffer is empty, the next pic can be shot. Big buffers allow the cam to continue writing, whilst the next shot is being taken (as in movie mode)

If the cam produces a JPEG image, the CCD can be read, and the data compressed in real time, as the ccd is being read. So less compressed data is sent to the cams buffer and less written to slower flash memory, leaving sufficient buffer memory to take the next shot.

So the ultimate cam is the one with the fastest processing and biggest cache /and or fastest storage media. My guess is, that real time processors have got quicker (AV movie mode in cam) but cam cache memory is 'sized to price' - so the smaller JPEG files will clear the cam earlier than a big TIFF or low compressed large JPEG files.
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Old Oct 23, 2002, 11:27 AM   #6
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I'd say stick with JPEG if you're concerned about write times and non stationary targets.

I've experimented briefly with TIFF on my CP4500, but concluded that it's not really a practical option for the kind of work I do (mainly wildlife). The difference in TIFF v JPEG image quality only becomes an issue when it's the limiting factor on the quality of the end shot.

When you've got a rapidly, or more accurately irregularly moving subject such as an animal you need to get several shots in order to catch the one where the animal stops for a brief look around. Taking garden birds on a bird feeder as an example I shoot on Continuous, starting as soon as the bird lands.

Most small birds will be on a feeder for about 5 to 10 seconds, pausing from feeding several times to check for predators. So using this approach you'll get 1 to 2 shots that will be sharp. Even fast shutter speeds don't help that much, you have to "catch the freeze" and that needs multiple shots.
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