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Old Dec 16, 2004, 7:29 PM   #1
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Can anyone offer tips on this topic. ISO, shutter speed, f-stop, etc? Thanks for any responses.
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Old Dec 16, 2004, 7:41 PM   #2
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hm...i can't really give you exact settings, because each time it would be different, due to different, lighting, but, i would think turning all lights off but the Christmas lights (if they're on the tree at least lol) and just using a tripod at f8-f22 (depending on your camera) and ISO 50 (or 100..watever the lowest setting you have is)

then meter for the correct exposure, and play around with shutter speeds till it looks good

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Old Dec 21, 2004, 2:10 AM   #3
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NNDman wrote:
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Can anyone offer tips on this topic. ISO, shutter speed, f-stop, etc? Thanks for any responses.
I would think this is exactly what digital cameras are made for--easy testing! Just set up your tree, put your camera on a tripod and start taking pictures at various shutter and lighting settings; you're not wasting any film, and you'll learn as you go.
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Old Dec 21, 2004, 7:30 AM   #4
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Norm is right: experiment. Beyond trying camera settings, try different lighting. Try in the morning/evening as the amount of light is changing fairly rapidly so you can shoot a fair number of differences fairly quickly. Try with and without flash, and with the flash at different intensity settings. Think about which you want to emphasize: the tree or the lights.

If you don't allready have it, get an EXIF viewer so you can see what settings (f/stop, aperature, flash, ...) were used for each picture. Make a note of sunrise/sunset time so you can compare that to the time in the EXIF data (and check your the accuracy of your camera's date/time). The EXIF data is another advantage of digital: the camera keeps the technical notes that I always lost when shooting film.
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