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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:07 PM   #1
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I had some comments to make on the thread about pictures being stolen, but the thread has become "locked". So I can't comment on it

Was the intent of "Steve and Company" to stop talk about this (and then I won't create an other thread to continue it) or did something else happen?

Eric
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:09 PM   #2
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I'd guess it's simply because it was in danger of turning into a fight rather than a discussion, though hadn't got there yet in my opinion.
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:17 PM   #3
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MrPogo wrote:
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I'd guess it's simply because it was in danger of turning into a fight rather than a discussion, though hadn't got there yet in my opinion.
True (some people are determined to always have the last word). Instead of continuing in the direction it was going, a new thread is probably a good idea.
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:21 PM   #4
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If it helps at all, I apologize for any false information I may have stated, and I will check the information in the future, before posting.
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:21 PM   #5
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Salient remarks were made all around – I enjoyed reading it. I'm not a lawyer so I'll side-step the whole issue of ownership. I suppose my comment might cross some the wrong way but if one is truly worried about protecting their "property", especially "property" that might be associated with one's livelihood, do not post it online. There will always be a risk of misappropriation, I guess it's up to each individual to judge for themselves the number of obstacles used to thwart miscreants and the amount of stress one is willing to accept. However, I have seen some websites that have images you can not download via browser, perhaps this is what webmasters of photography sites should think of implementing.

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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:36 PM   #6
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Spark, the only way I've seen that comes close to actually preventing downloading of images is something I saw once. It required a special plugin that decrypted the image and displayed it while preventing (some how) screen capture software from working.

So no copy was stored in the browser cache (or maybe the encrypted one was?) and it can't be saved or screen captured. Of course, you could still photograph the screen, but that is going much further than most would do.

Short of that, I don't believe anything can stop someone from getting a copy of a picture put on the web. You can always pull it out of the web browser cache if you are determined.

So yes, the absolute best way to not have your work stolen is to not post it on the web. Sad, but true. I know some professionals who reason it this way. What they put on the web is really low quality and size. This prevents the printing of a reasonable size print at a reasonable quality. Anyone who would be happy with that type of print would not buy from them any ways, so that person stealing from them isn't really costing them a sale. Sad, but probably true.

In the end, what I was going to add was mostly said by others.

both Bradg and MrPogo were correct. I went and read the US Copyright Office's web page (like a few others did) and make sure I was right. Here is what I learned:
-The instant you take the picture you own copyright.
-You don't technically have to mark the picture as copyrighted any more (but it can help.)
-You can register pictures in bulk (I know a lawyer that recommends bulk registering 10 at a time as a cost compromise.)
-If you want to sue, you need to have registered your picture.

I really, really didn't think the last one was right, but it is listed exactly as Bradg said. In very plain English. I could swear that I've heard of people suing who didn't actually register their picture. I know someone I can ask about this who has a copyright lawyer on retainer.

The copyright text can help to prove intent. Any picture that I put on the web that I think is of any use to anyone will get a copyright message in it. Then they have to actively remove it. This prevents what is called "innocent infringement" where the infringer didn't know the work was copyrighted. This will make it easier to prove the infraction and increase the damages.

Eric
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:48 PM   #7
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spark wrote:
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*snip* However, I have seen some websites that have images you can not download via browser, perhaps this is what webmasters of photography sites should think of implementing.

Sam
I think that as long as you can see it on your computer display, then it's 'gettable' right? Eg on windows machines... it's like Control-PrintScreen .. then paste into image editor. Or in internet-explorer web browser, you can usually just collect the image in the temporary internet files cache thing.
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 3:51 PM   #8
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I reckon that whoever owns the highest resolution original picture should have enough evidence that the picture is theirs...unless the picture they posted was at the original resolution (so nothing much we can do about that I guess).
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Old Dec 30, 2004, 4:10 PM   #9
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I have seen an article (not sure where, but I will try to find the link), that claimed you can submit an unlimited number of items for registeration. I believe the author stated that you could submit a CD full of thumbnails all for the $30.00 fee.

I didn't see it on the US Copyright site...here's what they say:

Two or more individual works may be registered with one application and fee as follows:

Unpublished Works

A group of unpublished works may be registered as a collection if all the following conditions are met.

* The elements of the collection are assembled in an orderly form.
* The combined elements bear a single title identifying the collection as a whole.
* The copyright claimant or claimants for each element in the collection are the same.
* All the elements are by the same author, or if they are by different authors, at least one author has contributed copyrightable authorship to each element.

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Old Dec 30, 2004, 4:55 PM   #10
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Some good info here:
http://www.krages.com//copy1.htm
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