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Old Jan 22, 2005, 5:05 PM   #11
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hey eric... so youre getting the same weather Im getting here in CT.

I was up in Ma. And in NH. yesterday and took some (hopefully) good shots of a few old churches... I had my old rebel xs with me (which prompted my question in the first place) i was thinking of getting a more "pro" film cam and thats why i wanted to know what was considered a good choice. i like to keep a camera in the truck with me so if I get a few minutes i can shoot some pics and I dont like to take the digital out while at work ... wouldnt want to hurt it..lol so i grabbed the old xs as i was running out the door. You all got some beutifull old buildings up there....

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 6:30 PM   #12
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zacker,

Looks as if you just missed the fun weather . . . I don't know what you are getting now, but herealong the Connecticut River valley we are getting dumped on. Can't wait to see what photos I can get via my snowshoes after it subsides.

Steve
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 7:29 PM   #13
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eric s wrote:
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The only thing I'll add to what JimC said is that I believe his shutter usage count is too low. I believe Pro cameras are rated at over 200,000 shutter clicks.
I was using Canon's number for "tested to".

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The EOS-1v's rubber-covered magnesium alloy body, combined with a hybrid chassis, 72 individual gaskets for prove moisture and dust resistance, a shutter tested to 150,000 cycles and familiar EOS-1 control layout make this flagship 35mm perfect for any pro.
http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/con...p;modelid=7244




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Old Jan 22, 2005, 8:34 PM   #14
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I was remembering their digital cameras, not film. The 1D MkII says (from steve's review):
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Its shutter is durability-tested to 200,000 exposures, the body is highly weather-resistant with more than 70 gaskets and seals, and the camera's lens mount is made of stainless steel (and is fully compatible with all Canon EF, TS-E and MP-E lenses).
My fault, but I was kinda right. Some pro cameras are that high.

Eric
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 9:08 PM   #15
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briers, were expecting up to 20-24 inches by morning... they are saying that the real fun will begin sometime before morning with full on blizzard conditions... its about 6 inches now.. hopfully it will provide for some nice photos tomorrow morning!

sooo the real difference between pro and not-so-pro is the body construction, weather-proofing and how many shots its about good for?? or shall i say the biggest difference?? what about if i got a better lense for the Rebel XL?? it does take nice pictures... but, i do so love the pro1.. especially not having to wait for film to come back after developing, and the fact that you can preview the shot on site.

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Old Jan 25, 2005, 1:49 AM   #16
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Thanks for the photozone site, Jim. Besides the lens ratings, it had some very good SLR user reviews. I had actually worked my way "up the SLR ladder" to the N8008s before I posted here. The price is very attractive; it can be had for about what I paid for the Olympus camera; however, after reading the reviews, I decided it wouldn't quite fit my needs. The Minolta Maxxum 5 costs only a bit more and got rave reviews, especially for auto focus speed and accuracy. Since I'm leaning heavily toward the new Minolta DSLR (or its successor) when I move up to a DSLR, I think the Maxxum 5 will work well as the "kiddie cam" I want now; and I can begin a careful accumulation of lensesto use later with Minolta's DSLR. Thanks again for the guidance. It was immensely helpful.
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Old Jan 25, 2005, 8:48 AM   #17
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lucky2505 wrote:
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Since I'm leaning heavily toward the new Minolta DSLR (or its successor) when I move up to a DSLR, I think the Maxxum 5 will work well as the "kiddie cam" I want now; and I can begin a careful accumulation of lensesto use later with Minolta's DSLR. Thanks again for the guidance. It was immensely helpful.
If you're thinking about moving to a DSLR later, then it's probably a good idea to buy a35mmmodel that can use the same lenses. Just keep in mind that your lenses will have a different angle of view when used on a DSLR. The Maxxum 7 Digital has a sensor that uses a 1.5x Crop Factor (as do Nikon DSLR models).

This means that you must multiply the actual focal length of lenses you use by 1.5x to get the 35mm equivalent focal length when they're used on these models. For example, a 50mm lens would have a 35mm equivalent focal length of 75mm. This can work well if you need more zoom. But, it can be a problem if you need a wider angle of view. So, make sure to take this into consideration when buying lenses (you may want to start out wider than normal, if you plan to use the lenses on a DSLR later).

BTW, here is a review of this model:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2002_...s/maxxum5.html


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Old Jan 28, 2005, 3:54 AM   #18
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Jim, thanks for pointing out the review of the Maxxum 5. I hadn't even realized that Steve did some film camera reviews. It confirmed my opinion that the Maxxum 5 was the camera for me. The digital revolution has certainly brought about some good deals in 35mm SLR's. I picked up a Maxxum 5, 28-80 kit lens, and BP-200 battery holder for $130. I'll dump the lens and start from there. I think I'll pick up a quality mid tele first, hopefully for $500-600. I'll probably hold off on the wide end for now. I never used it much on the Olympus for the kiddie pics anyway. I'm guessing Minolta or the aftermarket lens manufacturers will bring out wide teles that are digital-specific for the7D sooner rather than later. What do you think?
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