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Old Jan 21, 2005, 9:21 PM   #1
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how many pro photogs are here and do you guys know what model ofthe canon rebel film cam is considered a pro model... if there is one?? also what are some pro model film cams??

thanks all.

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Old Jan 21, 2005, 9:52 PM   #2
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There are very few Pro shooters here. That really isn't the nature of this forum.

I'm not sure I fully understand what you are asking. Are you asking what is Canon's "pro" model? The only one in active product (I think) is the Canon EOS-1V, although the EOS-3 is considered a lower grade pro/high end amature film camera.

The lenses that you put on the Rebel film camera will also fit the EOS-3 and EOS-1V.

You can find out more about the Canon EOS system on www.canoneos.com

Eric
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Old Jan 21, 2005, 10:48 PM   #3
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In the film world, the 35mm Rebel SLR is not considered a 'pro' camera in any way. It is an entry level,..."Oh, does the lens come off?"...holiday and birthday snapshot...never anything more than 4x6 printssort of camera. The most expensive combination and model of the Rebel (T2 QD) wouldn't cost any more than 30 rolls of Kodak Gold Max (Ugh!)...about $300. In other words, you could buy 5 of them for the price of an EOS 1V.

In the digital world, the marketing guys decided to tack the word 'pro' onto ANY camera that had interchangable lenses. So the Digital Rebel gets classed as a 'pro' camera when it really isn't.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 12:27 AM   #4
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ok.... i see. so, i guess what i just wanted to know is.... what the heck is the difference between a pro model and a prosumer model? i mean, there dont seem to be all that much excep for the price tags and how good a lense comes with it stock??

just curious is all... trying to learn. :idea:





really? none of you all on this forum is a professional photographer?? you could have fooled me with some of the pictures i see here.... damn, you guys are good :-)

thanks!

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 3:16 AM   #5
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This discussion brings me to a question I've wanted to ask here about a film camera but have avoided doing because, after all, this IS a digital camera forum. I hope you all will indulge me this one time. I shoot digital most of the time, but I still like using b&w film occasionally. Until recently, my 35mm cameras have been older, manual focus models. My extended family is at the point where there are lots of little kiddies running around now. I found that I missed too many shots of them because I simply couldn't focus fast enough to catch them before they moved. On a whim, I picked up a cheap, used Olympus 35mm with auto focus and a built in 28-120mm zoom lens and pop-up flash. The camera serves the purpose when I'm outdoors; however, what I didn't count on was the shutter lag indoors due to the pre-flash for redeye reduction. Obviously, I should have gotten a camera that would accept an external flash. I only paid $100 for the Olympus. I realize I'm going to have to spend more than that, but I really don't want to lay out a thousand bucks for an SLR with fast auto focus. When I spend that much, I'll be looking to go DSLR. I'd like your recommendations on a good consumer level 35mm auto focus SLR and a zoom lens with a range similar to the Olympus' 28-120mm. I have a nice Promaster 5900 flash with the standard module so it would be nice if the camera would work with that, but I could always purchase another module if necessary. Any recommendations? Thanks.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 9:17 AM   #6
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zacker wrote:
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ok.... i see. so, i guess what i just wanted to know is.... what the heck is the difference between a pro model and a prosumer model? i mean, there dont seem to be all that much excep for the price tags and how good a lense comes with it stock??

just curious is all... trying to learn. :idea:

A camera like the EOS-1V that erics and Meryl Arbing mentioned is a Pro model.

It's got a metal body,very fast frame rate,larger/brighter viewfinder, environmental sealing,a vastly superior Autofocus System (speed, realiability, able to focus in lower light, track rapidly moving subjects), a shutter designed for 150,000 actuations (probably 5-10 times what a consumer model is designed for), better external controls, features, etc.

The entry level SLR models are slower, cheaper build quality, no environmental sealing,inferior Autofocus System, smaller and dimmer viewfinder, not as many features....

Now, an entry level SLR model can take photos that are just as nice as a "pro" body, given the correct focus, exposure, lens quality, etc.Most amateurs don't really need the speed/features/reliability of a pro model, depending on the conditions they'll be using a camera in.

Many pros may not need a "pro" body either.After all, any camera that can make them moneycould beconsideredto be "pro". ;-)
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 10:04 AM   #7
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lucky2505 wrote:
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I only paid $100 for the Olympus. I realize I'm going to have to spend more than that, but I really don't want to lay out a thousand bucks for an SLR with fast auto focus. When I spend that much, I'll be looking to go DSLR. I'd like your recommendations on a good consumer level 35mm auto focus SLR and a zoom lens with a range similar to the Olympus' 28-120mm. I have a nice Promaster 5900 flash with the standard module so it would be nice if the camera would work with that, but I could always purchase another module if necessary. Any recommendations? Thanks.
Well, I'd avoid the point and shoot models like your Olympus. These typically are not going to be very fast cameras, and the lens quality usually leaves something to be desired.

Since this is a Digital Camera Forum, I don't know how many responses you'll get. If I were looking for a 35mmmodel on a tight budget, I'd look around for a used camera and lens (es).

You will have many lens choices, from a variety of manufacturers with an SLR. Optical Quality, Focus Speed, Lens Brightness, Size, Weight, etc., also vary widely. Quality is subjective, so you'll need to decide how much you want/need to spend.

You could probably pick up a used model that's relatively fast at somewhere like http://www.keh.com, http://www.adorama.com or http://www.bhphotovideo.com

These guys stock both used cameras and lenses.

Something like a Nikon N8008s is usuallyreasonably priced on the used market.

You can find lenses made by Nikon, Sigma, Tokina, Tamron and others for this model.

Here is a popular site with lens ratings (and there are more).

http://www.photozone.de/2Equipment/easytxt.htm




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Old Jan 22, 2005, 12:06 PM   #8
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well jim, you have certainly answered my question... thanks!!!

thank you to all who responded also...:-)

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Old Jan 22, 2005, 5:07 PM   #9
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Hey, I didn't say "there are no pros at this site". Just that there are very few. considering how many people come here, I can think of.... 6 or 10 which are pros. That is a very small fraction. I agree with you, there are some VERY GOOD amatures here.

The only thing I'll add to what JimC said is that I believe his shutter usage count is too low. I believe Pro cameras are rated at over 200,000 shutter clicks.

But his list is basically right. It does everything a amature body does, and then it has extras. Like being fully water proof. Believe it or not, Canon's top of the line digital camera (yes, digital), the 1Ds Mk II, is fully waterproof. Want to take pictures of yourself in the shower? use that camera and a waterproof lens.

How many amatures need that? Very few, but look at what I did today. I took pictures of Short Eared Owls in a snow storm at 10 degrees. I shouldn't have, as my 20D is not water proof. But I got away with it (and I whiped down my camera often.) I would have felt more comfortable doing it with a water proof camera.

Eric

ps. you wouldn't have noticed, but this question has been answered in some detail recently. Search for "pro camera" (or something similar) and you'll find more info.
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Old Jan 22, 2005, 5:40 PM   #10
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Minor correction, I believepro bodiesare:blah:weather resistant :blah:. Water proof kind of implies it would not mind a dunking.

eric s wrote:
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I would have felt more comfortable doing it with a water proof camera.
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