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Old Feb 12, 2005, 2:04 PM   #1
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Hey everyone,

Does anyone have a simple solution or know of a program that deals with the red-eye equivalent in animals? I have taken quite a few pictures of my dog and most of them have blue-eye present. I can use photoshop to fix this, but I was just wondering if there is an easier way.

Thanks.
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 2:19 PM   #2
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I have not been able to find this answer. I raise sitehounds that are night hunters and they all glow green and blue (nocturnal animals). I have had limited success with photo editing software. They sell a pet eye pen to manually touch up a hard copy but I find it makes them look dull. I have heard that a bounce flash will work. I just have to save the $150 for it!
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 6:24 PM   #3
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What I do is in photoshop (5.02, PC) copy the color of the retina from a good outdoor photo (no flash) and paint over the green eye. As long as I don't get too carried away and leave the highlights, it works pretty good. Unfortunately, it's a bit labor intensive if you have a lot of them to do..

The particular color shown is R53, G51, B56 if those numbers mean anything to you..
Jeff
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 8:12 PM   #4
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jsiladi does what I do. I have had the same problem in owls (although in them its steel colored, I believe.)

I use a selection tool to make sure I don't paint out of the lines, and then I paint over it. The problem with that is that the catch light can have an odd looking cast to it. Pink, for example. I don't have a good answer for that. On really good pictures I've used a single pixel white brush at about 20% opacity and then dab each pixel a or more times to change the color. Not perfect, and annoying as all get out, but effective.

Eric
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 11:26 PM   #5
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eric s wrote:
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jsiladi does what I do. I have had the same problem in owls (although in them its steel colored, I believe.)

I use a selection tool to make sure I don't paint out of the lines, and then I paint over it. The problem with that is that the catch light can have an odd looking cast to it. Pink, for example. I don't have a good answer for that. On really good pictures I've used a single pixel white brush at about 20% opacity and then dab each pixel a or more times to change the color. Not perfect, and annoying as all get out, but effective.

Eric
My workflow on these is basically the same.. The color mask (the wand tool) will pick the green and leave the highlights un-chosen.. Sometimes a little touchup around the outer edges is required but it's relatively fast. Just as fast as most red-eye reduction software I've used..

Jeff
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Old Feb 15, 2005, 9:08 AM   #6
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Thanks Guys
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Old Feb 16, 2005, 2:07 PM   #7
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With "Color Mechanic" software (it comes as a stand alone or plug in) you could simply change the blue to red (or black) and then your red eye removal function could work.
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