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Old Feb 19, 2005, 6:05 AM   #21
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Yes. As posted a month or so ago, I was confronted by a police officer within the NH DMV and told I could not take photos. Even after I explained I was taking them of my son making his way through the line to get his driver's license the rule was no photos.
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Old Feb 20, 2005, 1:57 PM   #22
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I was confronted by a Houston Symphony usher at a free outdoor concert in a city park ampitheater. The announcement had been made, no flash or video photography, so I was shooting digital stills with the flash off, using a small 1 MP camera (Kodak DC3200, a digital Brownie) with no video feature. She said, "Hey, you can't do that!" I repeated the announcement and said I was playing by the rules. She saw a security guard nearby and said, "Tell him he can't do that!" I told the guard the situation and he shrugged and walked off. Later, the guard came up to me (with the usher not around) and said, "Some of those cameras shoot video." I held the camera out to him, but he just put his hands up. He said, "Its a tough economy, she's trying to keep a job."

OK, its confusing to non-photographers, but if the usher had simply asked WHAT I was doing, rather than immediately get in my face, maybe we could have talked to her supervisor about the rules.
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Old Feb 21, 2005, 7:27 PM   #23
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Following this thread my aging memory came dimly back to life . . . several years ago, I was in Camden/Belfast area of Maine for part of the filming of "Man Without A Face." That was Mel Gibson's directing debut I believe. I had my Nikon 2020 plus a video camera with me. I ran out of things/people to take photos of long before the filming was complete. The video camera had the light taped so it never appeared to be on. My 2020 and I were such good friends I rarely had to raise it up to my eye. I have a hunch I would have been spoken to if I had not been so discrete (sneaky). That was then and not something I would do now . . . :-)
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Old Apr 3, 2005, 11:14 PM   #24
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Jeez this is all pretty ridiculous. Not being able to take pictures of a squirel? C'mon thats insane. I would have told that park ranger where to go (not to act tough). The majority of the photography I do is particulary prone to be harrased by security gaurds and police. I take pictures of abandoned buildings, mental hospitals, factories and other types of urban ruins. Usually these properties are posted no tresspasing and if caught your subject to a fine. It's a strange, macabre subject for photography but I love it. Ive been exploring such places for years now and have recently started seriously photographing them.
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Old Apr 4, 2005, 1:43 AM   #25
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PeterP wrote:
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Brings to mind a local new story from last year where the police were trying to locate an individual for questioning. The crime they wanted him for: shooting near and around a school yard. They were called by the school officials who notice him and called in. I guess worried he might be up to no good.

Sad, sad times.

Come to think of it maybe there is a good reason for an in camera wireless link, if someone tries to seize your card the images are already saved somewhere else.

Peter.


I have not heard of this wireless link? How does it work?
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Old Apr 4, 2005, 7:01 AM   #26
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I was taking photos around my home town when I had not long had my 20D.

We have a fairly new court house. My father was taking photos of the front (with his E-1) when a security guard came out and asked him to clear off.

I thought it was a public place so after the guard had gone back in to his desk I went up and took some photos too.

The guard was back out again quickly shouting and waving his arms. My 20D was on continuous drive so I just pointed it at him and got lots of lovely close ups of a irate guard.

I have been asked to leave shopping centres, but sometimes when you tell them it's for personal use (which in my case is true) they are fine.

I can understand the security implications of certain locations, but other than that, why do they want to prevent you from taking photos in seeming public places.?

Do they think you will make money from it?
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Old Apr 4, 2005, 7:07 AM   #27
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pagerboy wrote:
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I have not heard of this wireless link? How does it work?
It's just a WiFi adaptor attached to the bottom of your camera and allows you to be wirelessly tethered to a PC.

A friend "not with you" could be carrying a laptop with WiFi.

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Old Apr 4, 2005, 11:25 AM   #28
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I had originally said "Only once", now should update to Only Twice.

Ejected from Mount Pleasant Cemetery for the crime of wanting to shoot old mausoleums and tomb stones. I have heard from others now that they got the same treatment. Apparently carrying a tripod is the tip off the get you noticed fast, but even without you get noticed after while. They just ask you to vacate the premise.

Peter.

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Old Apr 4, 2005, 1:16 PM   #29
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I think most of it's pretty silly.. Especially on the bridges aspect.. There isn't an angle that has NOT been photographed of them at some point in time.. The Mackinak for instance, there is film footage of the thing being built.. Anyone who was REALLY interested, wouldn't have to look further than the discovery or history channels to get all the info they need, from the comfort of the living room couch.. In Detroit, "trespassing" abandonded buildings and sites, you are more likely to meet up with a crack head than the police. To answer the question, No, I've never been asked to leave a location just for taking pictures.

Jeff
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Old Apr 4, 2005, 2:54 PM   #30
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To be on the verge of getting too political (something we try to keep off this forum) what you are complaining about is the "illusion of security" vs. "actual security."

Ok, I deleted most of my post because I did get too political. I agree with you... stopping photographers will only catch the dumb enemies of the state. Sure, I'd like to catch them too, but honestly I'm more afraid of the smart ones (who get a book or PBS special about the subject out of the library.)

Eric
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