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Old Feb 23, 2005, 2:53 AM   #11
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None taken... It just isn't worth arguing about.. If we wanted to we could go to a politics forum and beat the living bejesus out of each other.. :lol: But I don't like those places and that's why I hang around here.

Hankerchiefs kind of predate me except for the wadded up one my grandmother use to hold on to when she got nervous..

In moderation and with care, any of the accepted methods would probably work. The best solution is to keep foreign matter away from the lens to begin with.. That's why I suggest a UV filter.. Perhaps it's just me but I've never noticed a loss by using one. I do know that Some light may be blocked by them but for most situations, better a dirty filter and very slight loss of resolution than a dirty scratched up lens and a Lot of loss.. I've had a lot of cameras come through here and I really have to wonder with some of them what folks have done to their cameras.

Keep shooting...

Jeff
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Old Feb 23, 2005, 10:13 AM   #12
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If you scratched a lens while using microfiber then you likely failed to clean your cloth regularly. Use your judgment when deciding when to clean, but don't just throw it into the laundry - I soak it alone, rinse several times and air dry.

I don't have nearly the experience of either of you, but I would never use cleaning solution or lens tissues.

Distilled water is alot cleaner than your breath (which IS NOT DISTILLED WATER!) so I'm curious at to why one would warn against using any liquid but would breathe on their lenses.


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Old Feb 23, 2005, 12:21 PM   #13
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Over the years I have field-cleaned lenseson consumer digicams and digital SLRs by using a clean portion of the tail of my t-shirt. This is of course not recommended, especially if you have hard debris on the lens but for the occassional fingerprint, rain drop, etc - it works. Modern multi-coatedlenses are a lot tougher than most people give them credit for. Now if it is an $8000 Canon prime telephoto lens that's another story, it would get treated better than my girlfriend
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Old Feb 23, 2005, 12:24 PM   #14
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jkusmier wrote:
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If you scratched a lens while using microfiber then you likely failed to clean your cloth regularly. Use your judgment when deciding when to clean, but don't just throw it into the laundry - I soak it alone, rinse several times and air dry.

I don't have nearly the experience of either of you, but I would never use cleaning solution or lens tissues.

Distilled water is alot cleaner than your breath (which IS NOT DISTILLED WATER!) so I'm curious at to why one would warn against using any liquid but would breathe on their lenses.

The MF cloth hadn't been used very many times. It worked great on the first couple. I had sold an aftermarket lens for a pentax mount and before sending it I used the MF cloth to clean it. Looking toward the light afterwards, there were Many scratches that weren't there before.. I had to return the cutomers money and take a bit of the loss on the lens just to get rid of it. From that point on I simply don't use them and I never recommend that someone else does. If they work for you, great..

Re-read my post.. I said don't put fluid directly on the lens. The reason being, it can run and eventually build up on the edges. A lot of what people call edge haze on a lens is actually an accumulation of cleaning fluids combined with dirt. It can also seep into the lens housing and possibly cause the lens elements to separate.

Re the fog, fogging the lens will show you where traces of the cleaning fluid have been left behind that you might not see otherwise. It will also show finger prints that you may not have seen otherwise. Remember that finger prints are oily in general and can actually etch itself into the coatings. I've seen this on a Rolleiflex TLR with a Planar lens and it couldn't be seen until the lens was fogged. Big ol' huge thumbprint right in the middle. Rendering the lens useless. Distilled water may be great for a general cleaning but it doesn't cut grease or oil, the reason I suggest using a camera lens cleaning fluid. With a gentle fluid cleaning followed by the fogging, you will have a crystal clear lens. That's been my experience anyway..

Jeff

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Old Feb 23, 2005, 7:58 PM   #15
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steve wrote:
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Over the years I have field-cleaned lenseson consumer digicams and digital SLRs by using a clean portion of the tail of my t-shirt.... ...Now if it is an $8000 Canon prime telephoto lens that's another story, it would get treated better than my girlfriend
So your girlfriend gets wiped with a clean portion of the tail of your t-shirt? OMan! NewHottie variation of S&M?:G

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Old Feb 26, 2005, 8:44 PM   #16
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:? I have in the past used a brush to remove visable debris from a lense then use alchol and a cotton swab to clean lenses. Has worked pretty well for me in the past. Any comments, please feel free.

I agree with Steve, todays coatings are better than the past as I have cleaned rifle scope and other glass this way as well.
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Old Feb 27, 2005, 8:35 PM   #17
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Golfer wrote:
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:? I have in the past used a brush to remove visible debris from a lense then use alchol and a cotton swab to clean lenses....
OK:

1. Brush. Satisfactory, if pure camel's hair w/rubber ferrule.

2. Alcohol. Not bad, but "lens-cleaning" fluid is warranted not to contain any oils or silicones.

3. Cotton Swab. Oh Please! Will scratch, majorly!

My Opinion Only,

F2Guy

PS: Secret: NEVER put your lenses in a situation where your have to do no more than "brush-dust" and "bulb-blow" them. If you've got "smudges" or "finger-prints", change something. Do not do that anymore.

PPS:In my 30 years of using all my Nikon F2 lenses--28, 35, 50, 50macro, 105--I'll bet I have "cleaned" them(with fluid)fewer than twice each.

F.
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Old Feb 27, 2005, 9:21 PM   #18
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I agree with F2Guy.

Slight variation, however.

Better to blow the dust off, either by lightly blowing on the lens, or by using a brush blower.

Only then try brushing. The idea is, to remove the grit, without rubbing it or brushing it into the lens.

Lenses are much hardier than we take them to be. And really minor stuff doesn't affect the image at the focal plane anyways.

Main thing is to keep your camera and lenses in a camera bag when not in use, not sitting out where they can collect dust.

-- Tezza
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