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Old Dec 5, 2002, 10:04 PM   #11
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Default All of That Except Cost

8) After 30 years of shooting film, I switched suddenly and totally out of film for most of the reasons already given. I had no illusions about cost savings, though. I figured digital would be more expensive.
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 7:09 AM   #12
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Everyone is right!

- The computer/printer/scanner are not in the equation, everybody needs this set-up. If it's not for E-mail then it's for accessing theses forums!

- Cost is relative: one can pay for a 'good' digicam after 20 'good processings' from Kodak labs. It costs more incrementally after that. Now if a person only uses disposable camera and only shoots snapshots occasionally then that's a different story altogether... and they wouldn't be looking at any camera either!

With regard to equipments cost the sky is the limit here: You can buy from an EOS Rebel to as much as an F5 with film, just like Digital... However if you look @ how they are put together, it's actually a bargain:
http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...960&highlight=
They're just a regular optical camera with its related optics/mechanical gearings mated to a PDA/laptop electronics... So imagine that you're actually getting two articles for the price of one !!! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 7:41 AM   #13
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What it really boils down to is we started using the digital cameras and then we became converts. Once we were hooked we like all the advantages that have been listed. I can not believe that I will ever use my 35mm camera again. Today you do not need the computer, scanner, printer, etc. You can take your media to Walmart and process it through one of Kodak machines. I do not believe that is for me but it is an option. I am with NHL that over the long run, I not sure how many developed rolls that would be, the digital camera is cheaper.
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 7:45 AM   #14
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The thing that got me into digital was the results that people were getting Digiscoping birds. You can get results that I used to only dream about 20 (or is it 25) years ago.

Other factors are that -

1) While the up-front investment is substantial (camera, PC, printer) you've got end to end control of the process. You can see exactly how shots are coming out on the camera and if the subject is co-operative you can try again.

2) I can get approximately 100 shots on a 128MB memory card and for Digiscoping I can shoot in continuous mode without shutter or motor drive vibration.

3) As it can be such a public domain I think you can also become more selective about what you keep and publish. You can see very high standard work in these forums and seek to emulate it.
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 9:45 AM   #15
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Default OH, and I forgot to mention...

While I share all of the above reasons for getting into digital, the best reason for me is that scanned pics posted on my Internet site weren't sharp and clear, and it was getting to be a hassle all the work that was involved in maintaining my website. And, there are those other reasons you might not ever know about...

OH, and I forgot to mention... I'm sure we've all had embarassing experiences with SLR cameras, so I'll share one of mine. We have a small church, and one Easter the dogwoods and azaleas were in magnificent bloom and I had planned on taking a family picture after church. One church member asked if I would take one of their family, and, well, I ended up taking a picture for each family that attended - maybe 22 shots. I didn't do this for hire, mind you-- it was just out of the kindness of my heart. After I got home, I finished the roll, rewound the film, and then opened the camera to remove the exposed film-- only it wasn't exposed.

Of course, I didn't find this out until I went to pick up my pictures, and NONE of them had come out! I surmised that when I loaded the film I hadn't put quite enough of the film leader on the takeup spool, and in my eagerness to take REALLY GREAT and memorable pics of my church friends, I neglected to monitor the movement of the film advance to ensure that the film was moving...

You can't imagine how embarassing it was when EVERYBODY wanted to see their pictures the next Sunday! The GOOD news is that I wasn't contractually required to provide these pics, and the sheepish reply of "...I'm sorry, but they didn't come out" seemed to satisfy my church family while allowing me to partially save face.

Now, with preview set to ON on my digital camera, I instantly know whether each pic is acceptable-- whether any eyes are closed, something's grossly out of focus, or there's a distracting shadow or something that would ruin a perfectly good shot. If I'm not sure, I can usually take a moment to review it enlarged to just to make sure. Call it instant gratification if you will, or simply peace of mind-- in any case, there's much less chance that one of those unforgettable, EMBARASSING situations will occur.

Digital has change my life forever, and like improving the above situation, it has been very, very good! GO DIGITAL!
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 10:09 AM   #16
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Lg,
This always be one of my fear with film. A friend of mine missed one of his rolls ( among ~20) in a wedding . I always check systematically at each beginning with the “film advance witness” ( a small pattern turning with the film movement at the back of the cam ) and check the spoll (?) crank to make sure it turns with the first (blank) frames .
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 12:02 PM   #17
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COOL THREAD!!!
For me, it was one too many sleepless nights of magical dreams and wonderful trips in the fields of La La Land, all within a small room full of developer and fixer fumes.
What, didn't that happen to everyone? :twisted:
AND THEN,...trying to do this with colour darkrooms :shock:
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 1:18 PM   #18
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Thanks for all the comments!

I think that today, anyone can get into it without the computer. There are many printers out there tha ttake all types of flash memory cards. Canon has Bubble Jet Direct printers that hook up directly to specific camera models. Review the pics on the camera, tell it what to print, and out comes a decent looking print. Not bad. And really, the printer isn't that expensive. For people that don't have computers, its an effective solutuion for total "do it your self" printing, as long you don't need to manipulate images. But really, that is not a huge issue, as most people are used to not mnaipulating 35mm film images before printing.

I'll give printing at home a shot. We'll see how it turns out. But with the proliferation of Fuji Digital Mini Labs at 26 cents (or even less) per 4x6 print, its very, very difficult for me to justify hassling with an injet printer.
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 2:51 PM   #19
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geof

Beside the nostalgic smell, rotating color drums are no fun... but it's always a pleasure to watch a B/W print come to life as one agitates it with the developper tray. Something that'll never happen with digital...

A flash card is pretty lifeless , where the fun in opening thoses photographic papers in plain daylight?
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Old Dec 6, 2002, 3:21 PM   #20
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way to go NHL! i didn't think there were that many people that remember the excitement of seeing the paper develop...It used to be what it was all about. Now all i get to see is the progress bar in my pc as photoshop is calculating a gaussian blur on a 100 mb image :?
I do love the new technology as well as the old one. But it was said right that film is on its way out.
For better or worse, you can't stop the progress train (for better i believe)
I wonder how many people actually started taking pictures in digital as a computer thing, and then got interested in it as a photo thing? Hmmmm :?: :?:
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