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Old Dec 14, 2002, 1:01 PM   #11
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If you use IrfanView (a great, freeeware utility), you can donwload a plugin that will read the EXIF data. Very handy. And free.
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Old Dec 14, 2002, 1:54 PM   #12
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My My, we're so lazy with our Googling! If your cam runs in auto most of the time, then you need to see EXIF headers to work out what it might have got wrong! Same with bracketed mode exposure. Or, what date and time did I take that pic, was it with my supercam or my barbie cam?

http://www.exifer.friedemann.info
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Old Dec 14, 2002, 10:29 PM   #13
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Your original question: "What was different about this one is that it listed the type of camera, lens and camera settings that were used when taking the photo. "

Try www.photosig.com

Most posters include camera data with their postings.
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Old Dec 15, 2002, 1:00 AM   #14
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Why not try the website

www.pbase.com

Just click on the EXIF under the pics...you'll see how the shot was taken.

BUT

The EXIFS will always show the truth with a modification - dont believe what you see. EXIFS will NOT learn you how to shoot you photos - UNLESS you make sure the photos is not edited. Thats often very difficult to see.

Example:


http://www.pbase.com/image/8872529&exif=Y (Edited)

http://www.pbase.com/image/7799072&exif=Y (Not edited)

maybe you thought is was the other way around ! It's not.

If you look at the exifs - they will tell you nothing usable other than with these setting you can take a photo and change it to the result you see...

Be carefull and dont believe everything your eyes sees!! (uuuuuuh)
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Old Dec 16, 2002, 12:47 PM   #15
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Richard - Thanks for the website. I was beginning to wonder if anyone was going to answer my original question.

Klaus - You make a good point about the EXIF not giving you the full story if there are any modifications. I am a little advanced to know that your 2nd photo was not edited but it is a good example. I guess one of my reasons for wanting to see EXIF files is because I wanted to learn how to take photos of subjects but have the background blurry (to focus on the subject). I am still an amateur at this and my initial understanding was just to use a low aperature setting. I am finding that is doesn't always work. I read a couple on-line articles and it mentions to use a fast shutter speed as well. Of course, it does not say what speed to use and how to determine the correct one. I mainly shoot in full "auto" mode and the aperature is usually always on a low setting, however, I guess the camera compensates with a shutter speed that allows everything in the photo to be in focus (which I don't want).

Any input on this topic from anyone would be appreciated.
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Old Dec 16, 2002, 1:19 PM   #16
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Maybe you know this - but Ill mention it anyway:

Why not do as I do in most cases. Choose the aperture yourself (typically the A program) and let the camera choose the shutter. all you have to do is to remember this "thumb-rule" :
if you're shooting at 35mm, then check the shutter to be at least 1/30 second (1/35) - and shooting at 200mm zoom you can shoot at 1/200second (1/250). If you have a steady hand like me you prob. will be able to get sharp photos at slower shutters.

Then you will get the idea of when the background gets blurry or not. (small F-number=blurry background=little DOF)

Remember this is freehanded and no flash.
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Old Dec 16, 2002, 7:03 PM   #17
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Klaus,

Thanks for the tips. I only knew bits and pieces of your comments but since it is still pretty new to me, it's still a bit confusing.

I have tried using the "Aperature Priority" mode like you suggested and I would use the lowest f-stop setting (2.8). The computer will choose its own shutter speed but I notice that if the subject is close, it will blur the background a bit. If the subject is farther away, most of the photo will be in focus (or the background will be very slight ly blurred). Any idea what I am doing wrong? I have the Olympus C-3000. Do I need to use manual focus or make sure the shutter speed should be in a certain range?

I'm not sure what you were referring when you mentioned the shutter speeds and 35mm and 200mm. Is this a regular SLR and how does it apply to digital?

Your last note mentioned that the advice reflected shots that do not use the flash. How does that make a difference?

Before I forget, you have some really nice shots on your albums.

Ken
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Old Dec 17, 2002, 3:39 AM   #18
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Thanks for your comment on my gallery.

First of all - regarding the blurry background - you must not compare the SLR and digicams ability to blur background. Digicams are not as good as SLRs.

These are the rules:

wideangleshots will be difficult to get blurry background on even using a little F-stop. That's the way it is with most digicams right now.
Close-up (zoomed - the more the better) will increase the blurry background using a little F-stop. The Depth Of Fields (DOF) will simply get smaller.
Using macrosettings on your digicam will make the DOF very small - but often also the focusrange.

Practically, when wanting blurry background, you must be sure that you focus point is in front of the scenery. Then point the camera at this point, push the button to focus - lift the camera up to frame your scenery and the push the button the last way down to shoot the pic. I would use manual focus for this - if you have it.

If you just point at the scenery and shoot, then most of the photo will be sharp - because the DOF both works in front of the focus point and back of it.

Regarding the shutterspeed - it was just an advice. If you shoot at wideangle i.e 30mm then don't expect to get your focuspoint sharp unless the shutterspeed is faster than 1/30 second a.s.o.
(unless you have a steady hand).

Regarding my note on the flash. A flash's range often works as its difficult to get blurry background in wideangle. The range is too small. However using zoom or macro it can be done -getting blurry backgrounds.

Did that help ?

(you know ...my english is very limited, thing can be hard to explain)
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Old Dec 17, 2002, 7:03 PM   #19
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The EXIF data is very useful for photos *you* take your self after you get them out of the camera and onto the computer before you do any manipulations.

But for looking at pics posted on the web, EXIF data doesn't mean a heck of a lot, IMHO
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Old Dec 20, 2002, 12:34 PM   #20
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Default minimal DOF

To keep the minimal DOF, you must combine as many of the three major points as possible:
1: get closer;
2: use a longer zoom setting (or optional tele lens if available);
3: use a smaller aperture number (f/1.8 or f/2.0, or f/2.8)
If you can calculate the near and far points of acceptable focus that make up the DOF, you can pick an autofocus point CLOSER to the camera than the subject, placing the subject just before the far point. This assumes that the BACKGROUND being in focus is what is objectionable. Choosing a different focus point is tricky with a digicam due to lack of lens markings and no published tables: trial and error may rule the day.
Another trick is to use a center-clear diffusion filter if the subject is just in the center of the pic (as is used for portraiture).
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