Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 19, 2005, 8:06 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Striderxl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 300
Default

Have been seeing this alot and have no idea what it is.



Thanks

Charlie
Striderxl is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 19, 2005, 8:15 PM   #2
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Bokeh is the blurred background resulting in an isolated subject. It is usually achieved via a large aperture (small f-stop). In the example below, the background is completely blurred (it's grass and a couple spruce trees). Again the affect is to isolate the subject.


JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2005, 9:29 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 824
Default

Striderxl wrote:
Quote:
Have been seeing this alot and have no idea what it is.
It's a Japanese word, taken from bokeru meaning to be fuzzy, forgetful, or senile. Here, it means the nice soft blurring effect of background you get with certain lenses. If you're into foreign terminology, here's another one I picked up recently from the Japanese: pinto no yama:

According to the dictionary, the word pinto is from the Dutch brandpunt, which in Japanese is taken to mean "focus." I personally think it also has some onomatopoeic associations with the word/sound pin to which means "something occurring in a very neat or clearcut way," but that's another matter. The second word no is the genetive particle, and yama means "mountain." Taken together, the phrase means "the focus mountain" or "mountain of focus," which makes about as much sense as ???, right?

I Googled around at some other Japanese sites, and found that the expression is used to mean "that point at which focus becomes supremely clear and unmistakable." One site suggested the expression came from associations with Japanese divine mountains-- like the "holy mountain" suddenly coming into view. Perfectly clear focus without any question or doubt. In practice, the expression seems to be most frequently used to describe characteristics of lenses or viewfinders. It's good when the pinto no yama is easy to see, and bad when it's not.

So if you need a new term to express that inexpressible instant of perfect focus, now you know what to say: pinto no yama.
Norm in Fujino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2005, 9:40 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,234
Default

'Bokeh' is what the lens does with out-of-focus details in the background. If the b/g doesn't have detail, bokeh doesn't really matter. Some people get really obsessed with 'good bokeh' and 'bad bokeh', but I have looked at examples, and fronkly don't see that much difference.

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2005, 11:03 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Striderxl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 300
Default

Thanks everyone for the info.



Charlie
Striderxl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 19, 2005, 11:03 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

"Bokeh" is thecurrentbuzz word of the chic camera crowd.
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:17 AM.