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Old May 17, 2005, 8:41 PM   #1
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When i look through the viewfinder i see a fair bit of dirt and grim on my shutter mirror. Obviously it does not effect my shots, however its becoming annoying.

Ive tried using a lens brush to push the dirt off the mirror, but that just added to the mess. Should i use a lens tissue and lens fluid?

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Old May 18, 2005, 5:10 PM   #2
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I am assuming this is a DSLR since point'n'shoots don't have mirrors. Be extremely careful with the mirror. It is very thin and extremely fragile. Too much pressure with a cotton swab could break it. I would have a camera repair shop clean it and the CCD at the same time. A couple weeks ago, I took my Nikon D100 in and had the sensor cleaned. For $40 they cleaned the CCD, mirror, the inside of the camera, and the back end of the lens I had mounted at the time. It took about 15 minutes.

Cal Rasmussen
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Old May 20, 2005, 5:06 AM   #3
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A TRUE STORY FROM ONLY LAST WEEK.

A good friend of mine decided that he would clean out his rather expensive, but relativly old Nikon. Against my strongest advice, he got his airhose from the workshop and blew around the inside of body to clear the dust out.

Did you know that a Mirror from an SLR can fly about 30 feet????

he's nowbought aSony digi...:lol:

Woody
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Old May 20, 2005, 6:04 AM   #4
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calr wrote:
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I am assuming this is a DSLR since point'n'shoots don't have mirrors. Be extremely careful with the mirror. It is very thin and extremely fragile. Too much pressure with a cotton swab could break it.
Not only that, but since they're front-silvered, they're very easy to scratch. In my film SLR "heyday" (early 1980s, mainly), the advice was to not use a brush--use the blower part of a blower-brush, or try blowing gently on it.
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Old May 22, 2005, 11:39 PM   #5
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I used a lens pen on mine and it worked fine. After reading this, I will probably only use light canned air, however.
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