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Old Jun 22, 2005, 7:36 AM   #1
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Hi, can someone help me with this query? I'm wondering if the cameras thesedays allow you to organise the storage of images whilst they are on the storage card before they are transfered to the PC.

Currently I use small cards, 32Mb, and if I play back the images they are just shown in the order I took them one by one. But when I buy a new camera, I will have much larger cards like 512Mb and will have a lot more images on them before they get transfered. Can you create a folder structure, like on the PC, and move the images around? Can youeven do things like hide certain images? I mean you may not necessarily want anyone who looks at yourcamera to see everything you've taken.

This probably differs fromcamera to camera - I'm looking at the Sony T3 or maybe the Casio Z750 - and would appreciate some help on this.


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Old Jun 22, 2005, 3:13 PM   #2
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I am sure this varies from camera to camera. Nikon has the ability to use one folder for all or multiple folders. However, you have no control over organizing the images. Also, in the multiple folder scheme, the camera sets the name and restarts the image numbering scheme with each new folder.

Since I don't want any duplicate names, I use the single folder scheme.

I think the best thing for you to do is have the camera put all the pictures into one folder, download to the computer, and then do your organizing.

One thing you can do, although it is very risky, is plug the memory card into a card reader connected to your computer. The memory card will look to your computer like another disk drive. Any of your computer commands and programs will work with files on the memory card. You can rename, create folders, move files around, etc. The caveate is that the camera may not recognize what you have done on the computer.

NEVER format the card with the computer. The camera uses its own format structure on the card and it is not the same as the PC.

The safest policy is download the images from the card, put the card back into the camera and reformat it. One other note, it is not a good idea to delete individual pictures in the camera although all digital cameras have this capability. Deleting photos on the camera can result in fragmentation on the memory card and possibly corrupting it. To be safe, copy all photos to the computer and then delete the ones you don't want from the PC.

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Old Jun 22, 2005, 3:40 PM   #3
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I have a Z750 and you can't organize things within folders. You can hide images in the internal memory, but it is only about 9Mb and a best quality 7Mp JPG is 4.5Mb.

I find that Irfanview Thumbnails is great for sorting stuff into the computer. You can generate the thumbs in sizes up to 300 pixels so you can see what you are working with. You can hold the Ctrl key while selecting the ones you want sent to a particular folder on your computer. Then send them as a group. It will make thumbs of the card so you can control the download directly from the card to individual folders.

Odd choice of cameras. The T3 is a point and shoot with no optical finder and only 5 feet of flash range at wide – less at telephoto. If you would be happy with one of the Sony T models you definitely don't need the Z750. I would suggest something with a little more flash range though in a small point and shoot.

The Z750 is a tiny wonder. It has a large 2.5 inch LCD that covers almost the entire back of the camera and still manages to fit a small optical finder. It has manual plus aperture and shutter priority exposure. Manual focus. A good range of white balance adjustments including the ability to use a white sheet of paper for difficult lighting. The controls are the best I've seen on a small camera. The movie mode will buffer 5 seconds so you can start shooting after something happens and include the previous 5 seconds. Now that I have used that feature I wouldn't want to be without it.

This review might be a little over enthusiastic, but I agree that the camera was designed by photo enthusiasts who also happen to be engineers. http://www.kenrockwell.com/casio/exz750.htm#intro

If you want a pure point and shoot I wouldn't recommend it. You have to be careful of the lens extension or you can cause lens errors. I disabled the auto-on features and plan to elongate a tiny O-Ring and put it around the power switch so it doesn't get turned on accidentally. It is worth it to me as the camera offers a package that no other small camera comes close to for my use. It works well in auto, but there isn't a reason to have to be so careful of the lens extension if you don't need the extras it offers IMO.


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Old Jun 23, 2005, 5:17 AM   #4
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Thanks Slipe - I must admit I'm hugely tempted by the z750 it looks awsome.

The only feature that keeps me looking at the Sony T3 is that there is no lens extraction, it's all internal. I know this isn't a common desire for cameras, but it appeals to me - it means you can use the camera much more sneakily!

The audio recording is of interest too - is it good enough to get a decent representation of live music?
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Old Jun 23, 2005, 9:28 AM   #5
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The audio recording is of interest too - is it good enough to get a decent representation of live music?
I doubt that - it is mono. Quality is OK for voice but I haven't recorded music with it.

There are other "sneaky" cameras that have better flash. You will not be happy with a 3 foot flash range at telephoto.

I think a flip-out or articulated LCD can be sneakier than a lens that doesn't extend. Nobody notices an extended lens if the person with the camera is looking the other way.


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