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Old Jul 6, 2005, 7:18 PM   #11
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Some NEC models use the same components as the LaCie monitors, which are very good. But that certaily doesn't mean all of them. It is very possible that their lower end models are not good but their high end ones are.

Thanks for that other link. My monitor is around 9 years old now, so I'm starting to learn about LCDs to see if one would be right for me. So far, I'm not sure...

Eric
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Old Jul 7, 2005, 1:02 AM   #12
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Some NEC models use the same components as the LaCie monitors, which are very good. But that certaily doesn't mean all of them. It is very possible that their lower end models are not good but their high end ones are.
after reading articles about LCDs I've got feeling that data from manufacturers should be hardly checking before buying as there is no clear standart for measurements right now. Too bad that monitors doesn't have remark about technology they built in and matrix used as it would make searches a bit easier.

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Thanks for that other link. My monitor is around 9 years old now, so I'm starting to learn about LCDs to see if one would be right for me.
same here, I only know that I need to research more in order to find most colorful one which would be available to be shipped in my area, I don't really put much priority for reation time as I guess that could live with relatively slow one. So I'll keep looking for tests and LCD reviews and would appreciate if you share if you find something interesrtng.
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Old Jul 7, 2005, 1:48 PM   #13
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I'm in a slightly different bind from you. I sell some of my work, and so reproduction of what the printer will produce is the ultimate priority for me. I absolutely hate it I get the picture right only to print it and have it look different. I profile my monitor and have very good profiles for my printer... and I think it's all set up right. But something has changed because not my prints don't match. Lately the prints have been darker. Drives me absolutely NUTS!!!!

I am willing to spend extra money on a monitor which profiles well and can be made to represent the printed results well. This could mean a $700-$1000 21"-23" LCD. This is because it will save me money on resources (ink/paper/printer wear) and money in my time (re-tweeking the image to make it look right on paper.)

So I'm going to swap out my old CRT for a much younger (smaller) one, profile it and see if that solves the problem. If it does, then I'm going to replace it when I get back from upcoming vacation.

Eric
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Old Jul 11, 2005, 4:13 PM   #14
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Sorry to hear about your problem, Eric. Hope you'll find out what causing this difference in colors. and if you ever decide which model you buy or just have some interesting info I'll appreciate if you share it here, as it could be that due to lack of money I still not buy my monitor.

I'm also looking forward for more opinions from LCD users, if anybody of them are reading this post.
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Old Jul 11, 2005, 9:12 PM   #15
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I got my situation to a state where I'm generally happy.

I had to profile my monitor multiple times (maybe I imade a mistake the first time?) and things got better. Still, it's clear that that monitor is on its way out. If it's 4 months or a year I'm not sure. But an 8 year old monitor has clearly out lived its expected life.

Eric
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Old Jul 12, 2005, 12:20 AM   #16
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if you want to try a good reasonable LCD

the samsung 193P+. it is relatively new





Panel Type:

a-si TFT/PVA



Viewable Size:

19"


Pixel Pitch:

0.294mm


Brightness:

250 cd/m²


Contrast Ratio:

1000:1


Viewing Angle:

178°/178°


Interface:

Analog/Digital


Response Time:

8 ms (G to G)


Native Resolution:

1280 x 1024


Maximum Color:

16.7M


Input Video Signal:

Analog RGB, DVI Digital Link


Sync Type:

Separate H/V, Composite HV


Input Connectors:

15-Pin D-Sub, DVI-D


Power Consumption:

40 Watts (max)


VESA® Wall Mount:

75 mm (optional)


Emission Standard:

TCO '03


Bezel Color:

Silver (Front)/White (Back)


Dimensions:

16.7x16.3x9.3 (WxHxD) inches (w/stand)


Weight:

15.6 lbs



Special Features:

MagicBright, MagicTune with Asset Management, MagicColor with MagicZone, Narrow Bezel, Slim Buttonless Design, MagicStand Dual Hinge Design with MagicPivot (auto-rotate), Hidden Cable System



Compatibility:

PC/Windows, Macintosh, Sun Microsystems



Warranty (P/L/B):

3/3/3 (years)

price about $575

i call every 4 wks using the gretag macbeth unit

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Old Jul 12, 2005, 12:24 AM   #17
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eric s wrote:
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Still, it's clear that that monitor is on its way out. If it's 4 months or a year I'm not sure. But an 8 year old monitor has clearly out lived its expected life.

Eric

The monitor i use is a Gateway EV700.
This came with my first computer back when Windows 95 just came out, purchased in 95 or 96. This monitor is almost near 10 years old, and VERY RARELY do i have to recalibrate it. And even then, only slightly.

Quality CRT monitors will live much longer than expected. Just like Quality TV sets, have a great color long after 10 years.

-Travis-
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Old Jul 12, 2005, 12:28 AM   #18
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i take it you do not use a hardware cal tool ?.
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Old Jul 12, 2005, 7:21 AM   #19
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No, i use the Adobe gamma Loader, which i have been using for the past couple of years.

-Travis-
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Old Jul 12, 2005, 7:34 AM   #20
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then regretfully you are no where near the true values to get your image as it truely should be. a CRT ages and shifts no matter how you look at it. yes a good monitor will last longer then a lesser model but it will have and end of life and 10 years is unfortunately for more critical work is well beyond that. if you calibrated yours today using a gretag or other hardware cal tool it would most likely fail to reach some of the values in true luminance, gamma, and or all color values to get a true (critical) on screen for printing.

the Gamma loader is only on piece of the ICC puzzle. eyeballing it in really doesn't work but some find it acceptable. in fact when you use a cal unit the gamma loader is out of the picture unused.

you would see a substantial difference in your prints and it will be easier to dial in an image.

on a CRT you realize that in order to reach minimum true color values you need to have it on for a minimum of 1-1.5 hours before using for color critical apps. thats to heat up the phosphors.
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