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Old Aug 1, 2005, 1:13 PM   #11
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you can get the portra 800 film at most pro camera stores and some of the chains such as wolf.. if not, just order it online..

also, some pro camera stores will do some high resolution scans for you.. you will just have to ask.. also, you may be able to send in your rolls of film somewhere and have them do it for you.. you can probably do a search online for "mail in high resolution film scans" or something to that effect.. not really sure.. mb someone here can help me out.. also a nice scanner doesn't cost a fortune if you have the budget.. something like the canon 8400, minolta scan dual IV, or epson 3870..

and do read eric's posts, he gives good advice..
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Old Aug 1, 2005, 3:33 PM   #12
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eric, i'm very appreciative of your advice, and i have read what you have to say about wedding photography.. mainly the point that i should get out of it. however, i'm not able to get out of doing this so the lecture about gettin chicken pox will do me no good. i need practical advice now so i can do well. they're not expecting me to come up with humongous prints of glamourous photos from the wedding. they've told me the top size they'd care to have is 8 x 10, which isn't a problem for my 20D. i've done my best to let them know that i'm no professional and cannot gaurantee what i do to be up to any high standards. that having been said, i'm looking forward to the challenge, and am looking forward to seeing how well i can do. i understand your points about them remembering that i screwed up the wedding photos (if i did) forever. luckily i dont really care too much if they're a lilttle let down, after all, they're going to be living in texas, the most heat i'll take will be over the phone. all kidding aside, i'm looking forward to doing the best that i can and am trying to be as prepared as i can. i would appreciate your input, eric, as to what lens setup i should use with my two bodies, 20D and rebel ti 35mm. my lenses are listed in the first comment in this thread. Thanks.

-Michael-
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Old Aug 1, 2005, 3:35 PM   #13
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btw does that portra 800 film need to be processed/developed at a special place or can i get it developed at a local store or chain?

-michael-
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Old Aug 1, 2005, 4:05 PM   #14
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portra can be developed anywhere.. though i would suggest at least going to a camera store to develop the ones you take at the wedding.. they will do a better job and they will handle your negatives with more care, allowing for better scans in the future..
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Old Aug 1, 2005, 5:07 PM   #15
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thanks!

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Old Aug 1, 2005, 5:38 PM   #16
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The quality of your photos could ruin your friendship with those people/relatives. You might think that can't happen, but I've read too many situations where it did happen because the stated expectations and the desired expectations were not the same. At least you accept this, but it not something I'd accept.

If you have read my previous posts, then you know:

-That you won't have much time to change lenses. So the choice of lenses depends on the space you're shooting in. Get some people to stand in the same location, with the same lighting, and see which lens works. The 17-40 f4 is a great lens if it fits your needs, but it sounds too short to me. The 28-138 is a good (not great) lens, and has the benefit of IS which will help. It is a slow lens, though, so depending on lighting it might not work. I don't believe your other lenses will be very useful (well, the 50 f1.8 is necessary if there is an important low-light part, but it would require a lens change, which could cost you a shot.) I bet you could rent the 28-135 for little money.
-The question about using a separate film camera is moot. Of course you should bring a separate camera. You MUST have a separate camera because your digital could fail in some way. And a camera failure is unacceptable. You need a backup for everything. Batteries, CF cards, camera bodies, lenses.
- Get someone who knows how the wedding is going to go and have them map it out for you. You have to learn where to be and when. You need to plan out your shots because you won't have time to do that during the situation. You should also go to the reception and learn who the important people so you get shots of them too.
- I've posted in the past a link to a list of shots you should get. I would show them this list and figure out which shots they want. This will limit your planning and let you concentrate on practicing those shots.
- Realize that you will have a split second to get certain critical shots. This is very important and you need to practice getting shots like that. Drive your family nuts by carrying the camera around and taking pictures of daily activities that you can anticipate. Someone pouring a drink (catch it just at the start, getting the liquid in the air.) If you hear a door open, catch the person walking through it (not already through; as they go through.) Things like that. You need to learn to anticipate that finger going into the ring and get that picture. Not after it's on, not when they are holding it waiting to slide it on, but while it goes on. (Get the others too, but you really want that one.)
- Wedding photography is less about the absolute right equipment as it is about getting the shot. Being in the right place with the proper light to get the good shot. In many situations (i.e. decent lighting… low light will limit you ‘cause of lens choices) a good length zoom lens will give you the flexibility you need. But they won't stop the cutting of the cake just for you, you have to be in the right place to catch that first cut.
- You have to be unobtrusive. No one should notice you and you can't effect how the event unfolds. This is something very difficult to do without practice… it's a learned skill combined with some innate talent in how you move.
- Don't have two lenses & two camera bodies thinking you'll have time to switch between them as you see something happen. By the time you switch cameras the shot will be gone. You need to plan when you'll use which lens and switch ahead of time.
- As I said before, proper exposure of both black and white at the same time is very hard. Practice it. You need detail in both the dress and the tux, but the 20D will clip the whites very easily, so you need to learn how to adjust the exposure with exposure comp to get that detail.
Does this help? It isn't what you were looking for… but with a proper lit wedding, it's more about getting the right shot. And that is less equipment oriented than it is your skill.
Eric
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Old Aug 1, 2005, 6:01 PM   #17
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i appreciate your help eric. i'm going to meet with the couple (my uncle and his fiance) within a couple weeks and will be laying out the groundwork for what they want/expect from me, and i'll certainly be informing them that i am not a professional but will try to do my best. it's going to be a pretty laid back wedding at my house, the ceremony being in the front yard, so i'm pretty sure the lighting will be fine, aside from a few tree shadows that will certainly fall over everyone. i'm hoping to use the 17-40 with the 20D so that i can get fairly wide angle shots of groups of people, as well as the wedding precession walking down the isle. this could also get some good shots of the ceremony as it takes place. i could have the 100mm f2.8 macro on the film camera to get close shots of the ceremony and portraits, or at least that's what i think will work, let me know what u think. i understand where you're coming from with your extreme oversion to taking this job but i really don't have a way to get out as they've seen some of my photography and are certain i will do a fine job, but i've tried to explain to them i've never done anything like this, which i will pound home when i meet with them in a week or so. the couple are in their 50's and have told me they aren't looking for some extravagant documentation of the wedding, they simply want a few shots to remember it, which is cool, if that's what they really mean, which i hope it is. thanks again for your assistance eric, as well as dustin. i hope you will both continue to help me along as i prepare for this event and i will certainly report back as to how it went.

-Michael-

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Old Aug 1, 2005, 11:15 PM   #18
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Hi: As someone who has been down that road before, I think you should listen to the advice ofEric S and catch Chicken Pox. From my experience, I back his comments 100%.

I found out the hard way, that taking wedding pictures for arelative is much worse than lending money to a relative:- a no-winproposition with the bride.

(The groom will think they're great, but the bride will not like them.) Your comments that your uncle thinks you will go a great job is a common occurance beforea wedding. That alone should set you running gor the hills!!

Never, never, listen to the groom. It's the bride that will decide if the photos are what she wanted. She will have some preconceived notions that you will not be aware of before the wedding, as she herself, will not be able to verbalize all her ideals.

And if you insist ondoing this wedding,get a friend who also has a good camera to help you. Four eyes and hands can be better than two.


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Old Aug 1, 2005, 11:59 PM   #19
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One of my prevous posts had a link to the wedding photographers FAQ. It basically talk about what it was like to shoot a wedding and some of what you'll need to know. Someone else here used it to convince the couple how hard it is to do wedding photography. You might want to print this out and share parts of itwith them:

http://www.koskiphotography.com/amateur.html

I bet you'll learn from it as well.

I have the 17-40, and I think that it is too wide for anything but the wide group shots. Try it out with three people (one "priest", the other two the couple) and see how far away you have to be to get just them in a reasonable tight shot. I think you'll find that its too close. I'll admit that I haven't tried it, so I could be wrong. But this is why I suggest you do it yourself... only you know how far you'll be able to be during the ceremony.

Because of this, I'd suggest reversing the lenses... but the 100 macro on the digital. It will be limiting (because its not a zoom) but I bet you'll use it more. I know that where I live, you can rent the 28-135 for $20 a day. I would seriously consider it. What I invision is this. The placement you'll need to get a proper closeup (little extra stuff on the sides) will require you to either be too close for the 17-40 or be somewhere you physically can't be with the 100 because it isn't a zoom. But without knowing the layout/setup of the wedding you won't know. A zoom lens lets you get the framing you want without having to move.. and when movement is restricted like in a wedding that can be worth more than the highest quality of lens.

Here is a list of shots that are traditionally taken. This isn't the list that I've seen in the past, but it looks comprehensive:
http://crogersphotography.com/Sample...to%20list.html

Serously, I think that you shouldn't do it, but I also don't think I can convince you not to. I know some very, very good photographers (full time pros with all the equipment they'd need and the skill to get good people shots) and they almost never do it.

Eric
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Old Aug 2, 2005, 12:05 AM   #20
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god you guys are killing me telling me i should get out of this thing. I CAN'T! i already know it could be a disaster if i screw up, but i don't need anymore advice about how to duck out of this thing, i've got to do it. i'll accept the consequences, should there be any, but it won't be my fault, after all, i've told them i'm not a professional and have never done anything of this nature, they have been forwarned. i refuse to take responsibility, should things go wrong, because i'm stamping my performance with this disclaimer in advance. that having been said i'll do my best, more advice is welcomed and encouraged but advice about how to duck out is worn out. i've heard it, i know it's a possible disaster, i know i should play sick, i know that, but i cant. please give me advice that will help me in the situation i'm in. Thanks.

-michael-

*I posted this as you were posting your last post eric, thanks for the links and information!
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