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Old Aug 13, 2005, 6:46 AM   #11
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You shouldn't have to change any settings if you take more photos under the same lighting conditions that you calibrated for, but if conditions change you will have to take another reading.
You shouldn't have to use a gray card to white-balance your camera very often. Most cameras have white-balance presets that are good enough for common lighting conditions, and minor color casts are easily handled later with software. But, if you plan to print pictures straight from the memory card, more attention must be paid to getting everything as right as you can in the camera. I never print from the card, and it makes me lazy about some things.
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Old Aug 13, 2005, 7:07 AM   #12
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Taking light-meter readings, whichever method you employ, is one of photography's greatest mysteries about which much has been written, debated and argued over.
In theory, an incident or grey-card reading give you the nearest thing to an averaged reading of the available light, which counteracts any effect that might occur to a meter reading where a highly reflective surface [such as water, glass etc] could fool the reflective meter readings taken with TTL and 'conventional' hand-held meters which do not give Incident meter-readings.
However, an Incident meter reading isn't much good when the reading needs to be such that the object you are photographing, needs to be photographed so that 'it' is accurately exposed, regardless of it's surroundings, eg, there is an extremely bright light source in the image area, the actual item you are photographing is in shade, and therefore, if you took an average reading of this, you would end up with your actual subject, under-exposed. For situations like this, your meter-reading has to allow for this unwanted light source. In situations like this, maybe a spot-meter reading is needed, wich is a meter-reading off a very small portion of the subject you wish to photograph.

TTL metering, can on many instances give you as good a reading as any other method, but at the end of the day, it depends more on how the meter-reading is taken and what it is taken off. Only a large amount of practice and experience based on what you find is the 'best' way of taking this meter-reading, will lead you to conclude which types of meter-readings suit how you take photographs.

There is no doubt in my mind that the purchase of something like Sekonic's L-308B that takes reflective and Incident meter readings, [and also offers you the option of taking flash meter readings.] or a Weston-Master IV, V or Euromaster complete with it's white domed Invacone, [often missing!] and a notepad to note the meter readings taken by camera and hand-held meter, and taking images based on all 3 methods, [TTL matrix, hand-relected, hand Incident] and then comparing the results, will enable you to understand what methods suit your taking-technique, and in time, you may well be able to look at a subject and pretty accurately guesstimate which method to employ, knowing that it will give the best compromise in exposure setting.

One of the major reasons why using a hand-held meter improves your photography, is because it is all to easy with TTL metering not to take any notice of what the meter is telling you, and using a hand-held meter, means that you do HAVE to know what it says, to set the camera, and from that, you learn quicker what does/does not work!

Since the lighting range of most subjects, exceeds that of any known image recording system, although B&W film, is probably the best of all, a digital colour image desaturated, will give you much more exposure latitude in your prints than a colour image which has just been converted to monochrome, as that applies a very small range of tones.

I hope that this 'ramble' helps in your quest in improving your images!
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Old Aug 16, 2005, 1:07 AM   #13
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Hey Grant, thanks for the hints. The road to learning is a long one. Takes time to grasp all these details.


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Old Aug 16, 2005, 1:29 AM   #14
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Samsauce, that is a lot more detail. Profoundly appreciated. One thing that comes across clearly from reading you is that one learns by doing the thing itself. In this case deliberately noticing the readings, recording them, comparing them, eventually learning what is best. It becomes second nature.:idea: Also it seems to me that the using of a handheld meter is a must and that must be because it improves the outcome - photographs.

One thing that I need to get rightis: Are these the types ofmeter reading: incident, reflective, spot and flash? Please improve my knowledge. Thanks for your contributions.
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Old Aug 21, 2005, 12:23 PM   #15
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Folks there ismore on the lightmeter on the website given (especially for canon users). http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...p/t-17154.html
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