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Old Aug 9, 2005, 4:04 AM   #1
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hey guys,i recently bought a cybershot p 200.* just now i was messing around with some of the photos on photoshop.* i have the camera set to 7m and 'fine' mode.* so this should be the highest resolution i assume.* but when i load the pix onto the computer they're all 72 dpi for some reason.* they're still really huge files but im not sure why the resolution isn't 300 dpi.* and im not sure where to set it in the menu, can't seem to find it.* i printed out a few photos on epson matte photo paper, 8x10 and they're pretty grainy.* anybody have any answers or tips?**thank you so much.ky
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Old Aug 9, 2005, 4:29 AM   #2
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the DPI settings you see have no relation to the quality of the camera image. It is just a setting that can be changed in photo editing or printing software, so as to determine the output or print size. It has no bearing on the screen quality or size. This is determined by your monitor resolution.

The real measure of the camera resolution is the megapixels. i.e. pixels across x pixels down. The more the better.

DPI does have a bearing on a photo print size & quality. e.g. say your image is 2400 pixels wide. Using photo editing or printing software, if you select an 8" wide print, the resulting print dpi will be 300, which is excellent. Selecting a 12" print gives a 200dpi print, which is still accepable, but you dont want much less for a good print.

Dont worry about those dpi properties you see. They are not a function of camera resolution or quality. If your prints are unsatisfactory, checkout the printing software to be sure your pixel resolution will yeild 200-300 dpi at the print size you choose.

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Old Aug 9, 2005, 1:34 PM   #3
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thanks!* that is really helpful and makes sense now...
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Old Aug 10, 2005, 2:13 AM   #4
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In Photoshop, just go to: Images>Image Size.
From the box that opens up, you can change your Document Size (The setting that determines the resolution of the image as sent to your printer.) to whatever you want for the size print you want to make.
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Old Aug 10, 2005, 4:35 AM   #5
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Hi Grant.. I am not familiar with PhotoShop. But I am trying to understand your advice here.

You say:
From the box that opens up, you can change your Document Size (The setting that determines the resolution of the image as sent to your printer.) to whatever you want for the size print you want to make.

It seems to imply that you can change the "setting", dpi, I presume to whatever you want, for the print size you want. Seems like magic. Can't be so. I guess I am reading it wrong. So my apologies. As I suggested above the relationship between pixels, dpi & print size is fixed. As one is changed, so do the others.

Never mind. I guess we both know what we mean.
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Baz.
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Old Aug 10, 2005, 9:30 PM   #6
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Yea. I think my reply was hastily stated.
Starting with the file size of the image to print, there are fixed values in the relationship between dpi and print size. I didn't mean to imply that just using the image size box allows you to print a given file at any size you want with the same resolution. What I mean to say is that you can adjust both print size and resolution in that same box.
If you want a print that's 8x10 at 300 dpi, you can't get that from a image smaller than 2,400 x 3,000 pixels without interpolation. But, you can get an 8x10 from a smaller image file at lower resolution. The Document Size box just lets you play around with these variables and arrive at a combination of printed size and resolution.
Where you have the most latitude is in downsizing a large image file. Even though the computer has to throw out pixels to do this, it's only working with original data and only leaves you with original data when you print. Upsizing through interpolation forces the computer to invent data that doesn't exist in the original image which can lead to more problems with image quality than you might get with downsizing.
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