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Old Jan 20, 2003, 11:34 AM   #1
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Default Bubbles/Spots in Night Shots. How to avoid? What are they?

I gave my Dad new camera....it's an Olympus D380 2MP. He has been trying to photograph the full moon with its reflection on the river. The photos have circles or bubbles in them...In one photo the circles are small...in the other photo they look like Glinda the good witch bubbles floating around! What are these? How can they be avoided? And any other recommendations about trying to photograph in the night time would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

There are two photos if you would like to take a look...
double click on them to enlarge them.

http://www.pbase.com/glackenny/inbox

Thanks,
Lee
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Old Jan 20, 2003, 12:24 PM   #2
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Any chance that he shot through a glass window?
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Old Jan 20, 2003, 12:51 PM   #3
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Looks like a lot of lens flair mixed in with terrible noise... Could it be a problem of long exposure mixed with an on-camera flash?
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Old Jan 20, 2003, 1:24 PM   #4
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Just lens flare, all cams suffer it. Does this camera have noise reduction for long exposures and did you use more than ISO 100 as they are very noisy.
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Old Jan 20, 2003, 2:01 PM   #5
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When using the camera in relative near no light conditions, you will see these spots because of the long explosure. Others refer to it as lens flare which is a good name for me. I would recommend setting the iso to less than 200, set the shutter speed to 1/15th of a second (also try 1/30th sec), then try to enlighten the shot with the editor.
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Old Jan 20, 2003, 11:50 PM   #6
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Glack, try shooting the full moon shots when there's still some blue light left in the sky at dusk or dawn, to lessen the noise and lens flare. Each evening/morning, the moon rises and sets a bit later. Here,in Hawaii, I'm kicking myself for missing the perfect night to catch the moonrise last Thurs. The next 2 nights were cloudy, and then it was too dark when the moon came up over the mountain. I'm going to try again next month. The best times here are 2 to 4 days before the full moon. Try it. Your camera can't handle the inky black of full dark.
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Old Jan 21, 2003, 7:20 AM   #7
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Thank you for all of your replies. I will try your suggestions!

Lee
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Old Jan 21, 2003, 8:52 PM   #8
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and I was thinking of doing astro photos withg my 5700!!!




Jim :shock:
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