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Old Jan 28, 2003, 12:36 AM   #1
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Default Manufacturers vs. Camera/Picture quality

May be this is a stupid question. But, I am a bit curious. Is it possible to list the digital camera manufacturers with the best one on the top and so on in relation to the quality of pictures taken by their respective digital cameras.
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Old Jan 28, 2003, 4:22 AM   #2
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Not really possible as each company has different levels of quality depending on whether a product is low-end or high-end. It's like cars, you can't compare the quality of an entry level car with a top of the line luxury model, even though both are made by the same company.

For instance, Olympus has three levels, the D-series for the amateur who wants a point-and-shoot pocket camera, the C-series for the enthusiasts who want more creative control, and the E-series for the professional who wants a digital-SLR. They're for different uses so you can't pick one and say that all the cameras are this level of quality.

Another thing is (for the most part) we're talking about consumer cameras, some may cost over $1000, but still aimed at the consumer market. If you want the best digital cameras be prepared to shell out $10,000-$30,000 and up, but these ones are mostly for studio use.

You have to judge each camera on its own merits, and you can't pick one and say it represents the brand and all it's other cameras.
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Old Jan 28, 2003, 8:23 AM   #3
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Default Re: Manufacturers vs. Camera/Picture quality

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Originally Posted by Mathew
... with the best one on the top and so on in relation to the quality of pictures taken by their respective digital cameras.
Mike_PEAT is right. In addition, there is the question, "Best for what?" I want a wide angle lens, seems most folks want a long lens. I'd like a camera that works well in low light, others want one that is small. And on through the list of trade-offs.

So it isn't possible to give a ranked list of cameras that is right for all users, never mind manufacturers.
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Old Jan 29, 2003, 3:01 AM   #4
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Thank you so much. I fully agree with you. What I actually meant was whether it is possible to say, for example, between two cameras of almost same pixels (say 3 MP) that Sony camera is better than Canon or vice versa. Here again, as you have rightly said, it may be quite possible that while the picture quality of one camera may be better than the other, the features of the other camera may be more advanced or even the price may differ.
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Old Jan 29, 2003, 3:46 AM   #5
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When I bought my current digital, I looked at its camera features before I looked at the digital features. For instance an SLR-like body, long zoom, an electronic viewfinder, can add filters, lenses and external flash, ability to adjust things like shutter speed, ISO, aperture, focus, etc.

Once I had a list of cameras that met that criteria, only then did I start looking at picture quality.

If I had gone the other way around I would have been looking at cameras for weeks that may take great pictures but may have been unsuitable for me.
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Old Jan 29, 2003, 7:38 AM   #6
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To follow on from the comments by Mike_PEAT and BillDrew, put together a list of what you want to use the camera for and let these requirements drive your choice.

For example you may want to specialise in Landscape photography. A starting point can be to have a look at the Landscape postings on this site and see what types of camera people are using. You'll find a large range of cameras in some specialities, in others less so.

You can then weight several potential camera choices on the basis of cost and the key features that you are looking for. These features will depend on the use you have in mind. For example some people may not wish to hump a big heavy camera around, other people will put up with the weight if the camera has a good macro feature for close-ups.

The final deciding feature may be comparative flexibility - your requirements may change. For example, I started of photographing birds (through a telescope) with my Nikon CP4500 then went on to insects etc etc.

Best of luck.
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