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View Poll Results: How many digital cameras do you own?
1 24 26.09%
2 33 35.87%
3 23 25.00%
4 5 5.43%
5+ 6 6.52%
Zero 1 1.09%
Voters: 92. You may not vote on this poll

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Old Feb 6, 2003, 1:37 PM   #11
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A few over 20....

Lin
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Old Feb 6, 2003, 2:14 PM   #12
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My normalcamera is the Oly 730. I also have a Jenoptic 800I but it's rubbish.

I've also owned and sold a Fuji 2400 and an Oly 3020.
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Old Feb 6, 2003, 2:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
A few over 20....
Lin, are you seriously saying you have over 20 digicams?

What's the story?
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Old Feb 6, 2003, 3:22 PM   #14
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Hi Steve,

Yes, I stopped counting at 20, but have acquired a few since - I Know, it's rather strange. Some collect stamps or coins, etc., and I collect digital cameras....

I shoot professionally, and back in 1995 I bought my first digital camera - a six megapixel Kodak DCS-460. It cost a virtual fortune in those days, but paid for itself in less than a year.

As the digital "revolution" continued, having paid nearly $30,000 for my first camera, I bought a second one which had MUCH lower resolution, but professional quality (a Sony DKC-ID1) for less than $2000 - a veritable "bargain" considering. I was contemplating some web advertising and shooting six megapixel images and resizing was wasteful of fairly expensive storage (much more expensive than today!) so the DKC-ID1 was a great little tool which did exactly what I needed.

Now I had the "extremes" of 6 megapixels and about .75 megapixels. Sony made another professional model shortly after which had 1.5 megapixels (DSC-D700) and also cost a bit under $2000 so I bought one to get a little higher resolution for larger images. It had a few bugs, but was a dynamite camera. Sony produced an "upgrade" model called the DSC-D770 and I bought one of them as well. Finally Sony took the D700/D770 away from their Professional Products Division and gave them to the Consumer Products Division (who hadn't a clue how to market them) and let the PPD build another "upgraded" version called the DKC-FP3 (black camera body, hand selected sensor, Firewire connect) and I bought one of them because it looked like the PPD as far as cameras were concerned was going to be disbanded.

By this time I had five digicams, and Kodak had released a significant upgrade to their DCS-460 and the street price had dropped to around $18K so I sold my DCS-460 and bought a DCS-560. The 460 had used Nikon lenses, and I had a pretty good collection of them (for my F5 Nikon film camera), but I had several Canon bodies and the 560 used Canon lenses, so I bought some more Canon glass for the 560 and that eventually led to me buying an EOS-D30, then an EOS-1D. The 560 was upgraded to a DCS-760 (which I still use) and that's the Pro-camera end of the story.

Meanwhile I became quite interested in using some of my excellent spotting scopes with cameras. That led to purchasing a CP950 Nikon (which led to another CP950, a 990, and a CP4500) for digiscoping. I was testing lenses for a British made prototype tele lens, and that led to buying several Olympus digicams (C200Z, C2500, C2100UZ, E-100RS, E10, etc.) and several more Sony digicams (DCS-S70, DCS-F707), some Epson and Canon (G1, S10, S100) and Fuji S602Z, Sigma SD9, etc.

The list just kept growing and I have had loads of fun in my spare time playing and testing the great variety of digicams.

Do I use them all? Yes, but I do have my favorites. I'm rarely out and about when not working that I don't carry at least one Nikon CP with an Eagle Eye OpticZoom 5x and B-300 1.7x tele and one Olympus (usually my E10 or C2100UZ). I have literally hundreds of peripherals in terms of lenses, adapters, etc., and I keep adding to the "collection." Every so often I'll part with one (I gave a friend in Vermont my DSC-D700) for a friend. Then I have room in my "safe" to replace the lost companion.

I now try to limit my non-professional purchases of new cameras to unique or special use instruments. I like examining controversial technology (SD9 for example) and will sometimes get one, test it and sell it. Photography for me is not only an occupation, it's a hobby as well - so I justify my excesses in terms of "therapy" :-)

Best regards,

Lin
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Old Feb 7, 2003, 2:59 AM   #15
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Now that you've heard from the "big guns", I'm on a beer budget:

Started C-H-E-A-P (wasn't sure I was really interested in digital). A Polaroid Fun Flash 640SE. It's CMOS sensor became less and less sharp: I think the flimsy plastic body warped and everything got out of alignment: all pictures needed enhancement :-(
Next was a Fuji FinePix 1300 1.3MP (for fun shots). Used it for a year, but it always had a defect in the lens protector which made a grey blob in blue skies. Fuji swapped it finally for a 2300 2.1 MP which I have been testing. In the meantime I had relegated the 1300 to my wife and bought a Fuji 2800 2.1MP, which I have been very happy with for about 6 months.
This week I bought another C-H-E-A-P camera: an Agfa ePhoto CL18 (CMOS 0.3MP) for $10 Cdn (refurbished)!!! This is now my "keep it in the car" camera. I wouldn't consider leaving my Fujis in that environment, but like to have the equivalent of a mini voice recorder along, to document things of interest as I drive around. Not very sharp (needs 15-25 percent sharpening in postprocessing), no removeable media (2MB built-in), but colors are acceptable, uses 2 AAs and USB, and any picture is "worth 1000 words" ;-) Get this: it has an f/2.0 lens, 1- 1/10,000 sec shutter and ISO 200 (that's not a typo) !!! It can take hand-held non-flash pictures in classrooms and shopping malls.
You can click on the "WWW" icon below to see some of my pics.
_____________________________________

35mm equipment:
Canon A1 (35-105 f/3.5, Sigma 18mm)
Canon EOS 1000F (35-80, 80-200)
Canon Z85 (38-85) P'n'S
Canon Z90W (28-90) P'n'S
Ricoh FF-1S (40mm Tessar design) manual focus P'n'S
Video:
Canon UCS-1 Hi-8
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Old Feb 7, 2003, 10:32 AM   #16
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Well, amazing story Lin.
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Old Feb 7, 2003, 1:25 PM   #17
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OH-MY-GOD !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

30 000$ FOR A DIGITAL CAMERA in 1995??? HOLY SSSSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH************TTTTTT TTTTTTT!!!!!!!!!


You gotta be rich or soemthing
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Old Feb 7, 2003, 2:20 PM   #18
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Quote:
You gotta be rich or soemthing
ROTFLMAO - I could only wish! No, it was strictly a business expense, and as it turned out, a good decision.

I suspect there is a "perception" problem with paying a lot for a "camera" because no one would think that about an Owner Operator (truck driver) who buys a truck tractor and pays $120,000 - or a farmer who buys a new John Deere Tractor and pays $75,000, etc. - or a delivery service who buys a couple vans for $25,000 each.

Tools of the trade are valued for what they can do for the user in terms of making life easier, or making more money. Sure - an excellent 35mm film camera in 1995 sold for around $1250. One could buy many such cameras for the slightly under $30 K (the MSRP was $39,000) I had to pay for the DCS-460. The difficulty is that when you shoot thousands of images per week, and only get about a 10% return on your investment (1 of ten is a "keeper") then you begin to think about ways to cut costs.

Remember when you were shooting film? Even when you are not doing it professionally, there is a tremendous amount of waste. How many shoe boxes of old photos do you have in your closet which really were not worth keeping, but you kept them anyway because you paid to have them developed and printed?

When you do it for your living, you don't waste as much because you usually develop and print your own. Of course there is a good deal of "time" involved both in the processing and in the examination of negatives and slides with a loupe to find those which you will print and present to your client. Time in the photography business IS money. I found that with the six megapixel digital and Kodak's excellent software, my workflow improved greatly. I could save over 90% of the time I formerly spent in the darkroom (I didn't drop film entirely - just 35mm color)sniffing chemicals and straining my eyes. Then there were hours of burning and dodging and airbrushing which, if you have experience with, is a royal pain in the behind. Hey - a few minutes with PhotoShop and the results were superior and I had much more time to spend actually taking photographs and acquiring new business.

Today, we have it really great as photographers. One can buy a dynamite pro level digicam like the EOS-1Ds for about a quarter of what I paid for my first. The quality is better, the cost is lower and the results are incredibly good. It's still possible to spend lots of money for a top end medium format back - but you will find a great number of photographers who see the advantages and are using medium format pro digital backs and are quite happy to invest what may "seem" like a small fortune. But the advantages are clear to us, and it's just another business expense to amortize and write off - now for those of us who really "enjoy" what we do - it's just an added "toy" to play with as well as work with -

Ain't life GREAT! :-)

Lin
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Old Feb 7, 2003, 2:29 PM   #19
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To Olivier,

Not always get unexpected info eh ? At least Lin chooses to collect digital cameras as a hobby !

Everyone is rich of something !!! :lol:

Harry
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Old Feb 8, 2003, 10:13 AM   #20
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Lin, you are a professional photographer - do you have a web site or other place to view your work. Perhaps you'll inspire us.
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