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Old Feb 19, 2003, 9:35 AM   #1
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Default Good LCD image - dark on computer

I recently bought the Cybershot DSC-P71 and while I like the camera, I have one problem. The photo can look great on the LCD on the camera, but it is much, much darker on the computer. Is there a problem here that I can fix - it is frustrating to find what looks like a great photo turn out to be very dark (and it is a very real difference).

Any suggestions welcome. Thanks.
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Old Feb 19, 2003, 9:57 AM   #2
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How well does your computer sceen match a print? Start there, though that is a mix of high-tech and blind luck (for me at least). It could be that the adjustment of your computer screen is way off
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Old Feb 19, 2003, 10:03 AM   #3
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Shots taken on my Nikon 5700 LCD are always brighter than when downloaded on to the computer and viewed on my monitor. I always have to do some post lightening and sharpening in photoshop. Glenn
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Old Feb 19, 2003, 2:52 PM   #4
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See my post under Steve's "Tips & Tricks" regarding calibrating your monitor first. Once that's done, take some pictures near your PC and look at them on your LCD. Then look at them on your newly adjusted monitor. Adjust your LCD to match your monitor. Remember this LCD setting (there's usually setting values of 1-10 or the like), as you may want to temporarily change it occasionally.
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Old Feb 19, 2003, 10:54 PM   #5
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rps,

I posted a note similar to yours a little while ago (nobody responded...I think I must be boring! )

The LCD screen on my C4000 is very bright and beautiful...it fooled me at first...especially when taking a shot of something that would normally require extra exposure compensation. I would not give enough compensation by eyeballing the LCD screen...I thought that they looked fine but then found them underexposed when I got back to the 'puter.

I have calibrated my monitor with Adobe Gamma...that wasn't the problem. Histograms confirm that the shots were underexposed.

You could lower the brightness of your LCD screen, as has already been suggested...I don't really want to because I like the brightness, especially when in sunlight, etc. You could lower it except when you really need it.

Does your camera allow you to view histograms? Mine does and I find them extremely helpful...I am trying to learn how to use them and to trust them.
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Old Feb 23, 2003, 2:19 AM   #6
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My personal solution to the problem was to buy a camera with an EVF that I could adjust to match my monitor and could be viewed properly in almost any lifght. I only use the LCD indoors for reviewing.
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Old Feb 23, 2003, 4:30 AM   #7
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Most users accept that the lcd is only good to frame and preview a picture. It's primary purpose seems to be to let you actually see a picture in bright daylight, so most users adjust the brightness to achieve this.

The best tool a camera has is the 'Histogram' display. It's not foolproof but can give a lot of useful info. if understood. If you're shooting in auto, have a look at this display for pics you have shot, you should get some idea if your pics are underexposed. Any display will be affected by ambient light and should be 'calibrated' as explained. Over exposure of highlights is the one prob most cams have in common, and I'm still waiting for a still cam to come out with a white clip warning.

If you are not sure about your monitor, download some of the members pics from here and see how they look compared to yours. As tube monitors age they lose emission and wear out. New lcd monitors don't age as such but colour matching, refresh and contrast can bring other problems.

When I last got some prints made, the firm sent me a 'target' - a test print using their actual printer and a test image. It's a bit crude, but you can put this alongside your monitor and see if it looks the same, then have some confidence about how your prints will turn out.
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Old Feb 24, 2003, 12:34 PM   #8
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If you are going to mainly print, you should match your PC monitor to your printer; then, if you use your LCD as your exposure indicator (not the best way) rather than the histogram or program match that to your PC. It will be more accurate that way.
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Old Feb 24, 2003, 2:22 PM   #9
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The only thing that is output device independent IS the histogram.

If the 255 bin is really full of '1's then it makes no odds what your printer/pc monitor/ lcd is telling you - you have an over exposed white highlight clipped image and no amount of editing will put back the detail lost.
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Old Feb 24, 2003, 3:24 PM   #10
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...But this model doesn't have a histogram when shooting though.....does it rps1499?
I think there are a lot of users who do relly on the LCD for exposure...incorrectly as that may be.
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