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Old Dec 15, 2005, 8:18 PM   #1
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Aside from wiping his nose prior to taking the shot, anyone have recommendations how to soften the snot that is glistining from under his nose? I'm using ArcSoft photoeditor.
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Old Dec 15, 2005, 8:28 PM   #2
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I would sample the nearby skin color and paint over it with a regular brush at about 10% flow (opacity). Go over it a few times and blend it with the nearby skin.
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Old Dec 15, 2005, 9:15 PM   #3
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Thank you! I noticed the file is much smaller 678K snotless vs 2.8MB untouched. I'm very much a novice at this. Why did the file drop in size? Anyway, here's the finished product:



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Old Dec 15, 2005, 9:35 PM   #4
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You likely resaved the image as a lower quality JPG than the original image.

Make sure you're not saving your full resolution images as JPGs. Every time you save an image as a JPG you lose quality and detail, even at the highest quality setting. JPG is a great format for posting images online, but for images that you want to keep and likely print, you should save as a PSD if you use Photoshop, or as a TIF (TGA is also lossless, but not as commonly used).

If you only want to view the images on screen though, and you know you aren't going to make any more changes, a JPG may be acceptable to you.
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Old Dec 16, 2005, 9:44 PM   #5
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mattroth54 wrote:
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Aside from wiping his nose prior to taking the shot, anyone have recommendations how to soften the snot that is glistining from under his nose? I'm using ArcSoft photoeditor.
Have you tried Kleenex?:lol:
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Old Dec 17, 2005, 9:49 AM   #6
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if you saved the edited version of the jpeg, as a different name, would the file size stay similair? I have noticed that when I edit a jpeg, I save as "file name" and add an "a" to it, so it doesn't overwrite the existing image. And the size is the same or bigger than the original. by adding the "a" to the file size, it tells me that I have that is probably the best image of that picture, and that is the one I print.( or whatever)
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Old Dec 17, 2005, 2:10 PM   #7
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When you save a file, it'll be the same size whether you overwrite another file or not. I typically add an A or a number after a file to indicate it is more recent as well.
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Old Dec 19, 2005, 6:29 PM   #8
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I used to do the "A" thing as well, but after this caused me to accidentally over-write my originals a couple times, I now do a different system: After I download all my pictures from one photography event (one trip, one walk in the park, one party, whatever) and put them all in one new folder, I select and copy that folder, go inside it, and paste. So now there's a folder with a copy of each picture, and this folder is inside the folder where the "original" pictures are. I rename this folder to "edited".

I only edit pictures in the "edited" folder - the pictures in the "originals" folder are like my negatives and should not be touched. If I screw up editing something in the "edited" folder and need to start over, I copy a picture from the "originals" folder into the "edited" folder.

In the edited folder, the first thing I usually do is open in Photoshop the pictures I like, and edit them for exposure, sharpness, color, composition (as little cropping and rotating as possible), and any cloning or painting (a.k.a. "cheating") like the snot removal you mention. (In my case it's usually removing those pesky spots made by dust on my SLR's sensor). I then save the picture as a JPEG qith quality 12. Any smaller or significantly cropped version of these images are saved as "...a", "...smaller", etc. The originals also get backed up into an external HD, and the edits are backed up later (when I'm done posting them online and so on - that is, when I'm fairly sure I'm done editing that batch).

Hmmm, this discussion is moving away from the original topic, but I suppose that's all right. If anyone has any more "file management" tips, I'd be curious to hear them.


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Old Dec 19, 2005, 6:39 PM   #9
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That's a great idea to prevent overwriting the orginial file.

You think YOU changed the topic? Here's my shot...what is the plane in your avatar doing? I've seen that vapor trail coming off wing tips on hard turns/climbs at airshows and never knew what causes it.
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Old Dec 20, 2005, 4:00 AM   #10
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Condensation caused by tight turns is one thing, condensation caused by sonic compression is slightly different. (Yes, I figure I was largely responsible for the change I myself called out, so what the heck, let's talk about thermodynamics now :?)

When air is compressed, it gets hotter. When air gets "stretched" (drop in pressure), it gets colder. The colder the air is, the less water it can hold. Air at a certain temperature and humidity has a "dew point", which is a temperature that, if that air is cooled below it, some of the water vapor dissolved in the air will consense into water droplets. If a significant drop in pressure causes the air to cool below the dew point, the places where that drop in pressure occurs will have visible condensation in them.

When airplanes turn tight, the vortices generated at the wing tips and by leading-edge-root extensions become more intense. The vortex is a cylinder of spinning air, and the air closer to the axis/center of the vortex spins faster. There is a centrifugal effect that drops the pressure (and the temperature) near the middle of the vortex. This leads to a "line" of condensation forming behind the wingtip and behind the leading-edge-root extensions:

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/015.jpg

http://airshowfan.com/ed05/8.JPG

http://airshowfan.com/pcam05/03.jpg

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/ind...ch=58889;image

(That last one's not mine but it's by a guy I know, Henk. His site is henkster.fotopic.net )

So that an airplane stays in the air, the air over the wings must be at a lower pressure, which "sucks the wings up". The tighter the airplane turns, the lower that pressure must be (so that the wing is sucked up with a greater force). So when airplanes make tight turns, sometimes the top of the wing is covered by a little cloud of condensation:

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/13.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/009.jpg

When airplanes approach the sound barrier, air is compressed and then expanded very sharply as the airplane moves through it, instead of being compressed and expanded slowly when it has time to "move out of the way" in slow-speed conditions. Abrupt drops in pressure that happen near the speed of sound can cause a cone of condensation to form around the airplane, and THAT is what's happening in my avatar. For some reason, the air in the right side of the plane is condensing its water while the air on the left side is not - maybe because the right side (the lower side) is more humid, I dunno. You can see the sonic consensation cone effect here:

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/14.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/15.jpg

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/ind...tach=282;image

(That last one is, again, not mine, but by Tyson Rininger, TVRphotography.com )

Of course, all these things happen much more visibly on humid days ("humid day" = "the dew point temperature is just a little below the current air temperature"). When it's raining, even airliners (which do not go through the loads and pressures that surround fighter jets) have condensation all over the place.

I'm an airplane guy first and a photographer second. I got into photography so that I could better capture the amazing and beautiful things I see at airshows.

(Did you guys ever watch "Connections"? Digital snot removal leads us to JPEG compression and file size, which leads us to file management and preservation, which leads me to feel free to talk about aerodynamics in a photography forum...)

Here's some more condensation:

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/34.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/24.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/019.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/018.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/017t.jpg

http://www.airshowfan.com/favorite-plane-pix/10.jpg

And all the condensation you could ever want:

http://www.fencecheck.com/forums/ind...pic,217.0.html

Sorry for hijacking this thread... :roll: We can go back to talking about photography now...
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