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Old Mar 8, 2003, 12:51 PM   #1
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Default How does Macro mode work?

I am curious as to how macro mode works and what its main purpose is?

Peace...

Shiggy
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Old Mar 8, 2003, 1:32 PM   #2
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Some here may start to think that you are trolling (posting questions just so people waste their time answering them). If you are really serious about all this you should get a good book on photography and read up on it. Don't forget we are spending our free time to help others out, but you have to try and help yourself out first. There are plenty of photography sources online too beyond Steve's:

http://www.photocourse.com/
-It's a free online "book" on the basics of digital photography, they have a page on Macro photography with samples

http://www.howstuffworks.com/
-A site where you can find out how things work, I refer to them whenever discussing how autofocusing works, and you can type in MACRO into the search engine and come up with everything from macro-viruses, to computer viruses, to camera macro, http://electronics.howstuffworks.com...al-camera9.htm

Sorry to say this, but we can't be your personal teacher and do all the work for you. You can even go into a search engine like Google.com and type in MACRO CAMERA WORKS +HOW and come up with the answers.

By the way, the basic answer is "macro is closeup photography"...as for how it works, you'll have to read up on how the lens works.
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Old Mar 8, 2003, 1:46 PM   #3
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I am merely providing topics of discussion that I find interesting and would like to know more about and think that other newbies might find interesting also. I apologize if my questions have put you out in some way. I don't appreciate the troll comment but I will take your opinion into consideration and stop posting much.

Peace...

Shiggy
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Old Mar 8, 2003, 2:30 PM   #4
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hmmm to anwser your Question. Most fixed-focus cameras have a switch you slide over which inside the camera slides a extra lens over the first lens which changes it into Macro mode.. I don't know about the Auto focus cameras..
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Old Mar 8, 2003, 11:15 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiggy
I am merely providing topics of discussion that I find interesting and would like to know more about and think that other newbies might find interesting also. I apologize if my questions have put you out in some way. I don't appreciate the troll comment but I will take your opinion into consideration and stop posting much.
Shiggy
This is a good question. But, I don't know the actual intention of your question. Are you asking the way of using the macro mode of your camera or the way of a camera lens handling macro photography. They have different answers of course. So, let me assume you know how to use the macro mode of your camera and only talk about its main purpose.

A typical photographic lens is designed to produce sharp images in some focus distances. In fact, most of them can handle very well when the subject distance (the distance between the camera and the subject) in mid-range, say from 3 ft to 20 or even 30 ft. Farther than the maximum designed distance, the lens can still perform well, but will not be as good as when it is used in the mid-range. If the subject distance is shorter than the minimum focus distance, the lens will fail to focus.

As we all know, if we get the camera closer to the subject, the image of that subject will be larger on the image. But, how large is large enough? There has to be a standard way, and this standard way is the so-called magnification. Suppose the length of a subject is L and the length of it in the image is K. The magnification of the lens being used is K/L, which is usually less than 1. If the magnification is in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 (resp., 1.0 to 50.0), we will say we are doing close-up (resp., macro) photography. More precisely, if the length of the subject in an image and the length of the subject are EQUAL or even larger, we are doing macro photography. Thus, with macro photography we will be able to see the very details of an object just like a high magnification microscope can reveal the unseen micro world.

Almost all consumer level digital camera cannot do 1X, or 1:1, macro photography due to the fact that their lenses are designed for general purpose. To achieve excellent macro result at 1X, one need to switch to SLR systems. Most SLR macro lenses are single focal length lenses with focal lengths 50-60mm, 90-105mm and 200mm and can achieve 1:1 without any accessories. For consumer digital cameras with the macro capability, one can use close-up lenses to achieve 40% to 80% actual size close-up photography. Of if your camera lens has a filter thread, you can also mount a 35mm SLR lenses reversely for nearly 1:1 macro photography. If you are interested, take a look at the Close-Up page of my Nikon Coolpix 2500 User Guide for a little more details. The reverse lens portion is not available at this moment but will be added soon.

Hope this helps.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
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Old Mar 9, 2003, 11:43 AM   #6
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Thanks for all the info Shene.
I noticed that you have a nikon coolpix 2500.
I am going to pick up a nikon coolpix 2100 this week.
Are you satisfied with the performance of the 2500?
What are the good aspects and bad aspects you have
found while you were using it?

Peace...

Shiggy
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Old Mar 9, 2003, 7:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiggy
Are you satisfied with the performance of the 2500?
What are the good aspects and bad aspects you have
found while you were using it?
Shiggy
Shiggy,

With its low price tag, I do not expect too much from the 2500. So, I must say I am satisfied. If is portable and easy to use. People have complain about finger prints on the lens; however, I have never encountered this problem. Maybe I am used to way stated in Nikon's manual. In day light and cloudy situation, the 2500 is very capable and delivers images with good quality. There are some problems, IMHO of course. First, many manual settings are not supported in the SCENE mode. For example, the Close Up mode does not allow manual white balance, which may produce images of shifted tonality if the auto white balance does not work well. Second, in low light and/or low contrast situations, the AF system is less than satisfactory. However, this is a general problem with many digital cameras rather than a problem unique to 2500. Third, because the on-board flash is very close to the lens, one can easily get red-eye. Moreover, the 2500 chooses a not so common flash control protocol, making the use of slave flashes less successful.

In general, most poor images I took with the 2500 are due to human errors rather than design flaws.

Hope this helps.

CK
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam
Nikon Coolpix 950/990/995/2500/4500 user guide
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