Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 6, 2006, 2:44 PM   #1
Member
 
woyteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Default

Hello everyone!

Can anyone tell me what is the difference between SS and ET (like in topic line)?
And how to achieve the difference? It makes the colors on the picture SO nice.

Thanks.


Attached Images
 
woyteg is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Feb 6, 2006, 5:03 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Indian Rocks Beach, FL
Posts: 4,036
Default

Forgive me if I misunderstand your question and am telling you what you already know.

Standard f-stops are f: 1.4 2 2.8 4 5.6 8 11 16 22 32

Each increase in f-stop number cuts your light by half. As you can see it is a logarithmic scale rather than linear, so you have to guess in between unless you are good with a scientific calculator or have a slide rule of some sort. Most people guess.

I have no idea why your data shows a shutter speed of 3.61 seconds and an exposure time of 1/20 second. The two are the same thing with most cameras. Maybe a Nikon owner can explain that.

Say you find that f8 gives you the sharpest images. So you set f8 in manual and have to set an exposure based on the automatic metering with your first shot. You reduce your light input 3 f-stops between f2.8 and f8. So you have to increase your shutter speed by that much to let in more light. 1/20 X2 X2 X2 is 1/10, 1/5, 1/2.5. So you would need about 1/2 second of exposure at f8 if you needed 1/20 at f2.8.

Better to let the camera figure it out with program shift.

Other than finding the sharpest f-stop for you lens, opening the lens blurs the background more. Use the widest f-stop (lowest number) to get the most blur in the background.

Better color can sometimes be achieved by tweaking the exposure up or down – usually down. You can do that just as well with the exposure compensation (EV) in automatic modes like program and aperture priority. Use small amounts or you will end up with bad exposures. Start with -0.3 EV and see if you like the colors better.



slipe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2006, 5:05 PM   #3
Member
 
woyteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Default

Slipe,

Thanks, I know that :-)

I just don't know how they achive the difference between SS and ET!!!
And believe me it gives outstanding effects in colors.

/w
woyteg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2006, 10:07 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
José A.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 367
Default

ET phone home?
José A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 6, 2006, 11:05 PM   #5
Member
 
woyteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Default

Jose very funny!

Did you read the subject line?

SS = Shutter Speed
ET = Exposure Time


woyteg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2006, 11:25 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
José A.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 367
Default

Yes, I read it.

Which setting is the one that gives you "outstanding effects in colors", and what does that mean?

Perhaps you could post an example (same pic took with different settings)?

Thanks.
José A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2006, 11:36 AM   #7
Member
 
woyteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Default

Jose,

I have no idea which one gives the effect.
For me they both were exactly the same thing, I don't know what to do to have them with two different readings.

I can't post any picture because I don't have any of my own.

Does anuone know why the readings were different?

woyteg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2006, 1:10 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
tmoreau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 477
Default

This dosent make any sense. You saw someone elses picture that showed a difference in SS vs ET and you liked the colors, right? Do you also have a D70, which is giving you the same SS and ET in the exif data?

That exif you posted shows that the picture was edited with photoshot cs2, whre the photographer no doubt enhanced the colors in some way. It probably also explains the ERROR in the exif data.

The film or sensor is being exposed for the whole time the shutter is open, and thats it. Thats the purpose of the shutter, to start and stop the exposure. That exif tag is wrong.
tmoreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2006, 1:11 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
tmoreau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 477
Default

BTW, 1/20 is .05 and 3/61 is also .05 .....

Also, aperture is listed twice.
tmoreau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 7, 2006, 1:58 PM   #10
Member
 
woyteg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 60
Default

And that's what I guess I wanted to hear/read.
Thanks.

woyteg is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:08 PM.