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Old Mar 1, 2006, 6:40 AM   #1
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An operation that has puzzled me for some time now. We do not hear if the camera should be switched off when changing lens. I bring this up because I remember some time back, a Canon A1 camera was repeatedly returned to the store with blown electronics. This was eventually sorted out by the user fitting a dedicated flash to his A1 with the camera switched on. On Canon cameras the sliding of contacts of the lens over the contacts of the body must mismatch the circuits.
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Old Mar 1, 2006, 9:10 AM   #2
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I know for Canon cameras, it is suggested that you turn off the camera when changing lenses - and that is what I do.

It is because the camera - lens coupling is an electronic one now and you risk frying things if you don't. Now, I've not turned it on many times (but still a small percent of the time) and never had a problem. But that doesn't mean I don't open myself up to a risk there when I make that mistake.

I assume the same is true of basically all modern cameras now.

Eric
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Old Mar 1, 2006, 9:32 AM   #3
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geriatric wrote:
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An operation that has puzzled me for some time now. We do not hear if the camera should be switched off when changing lens. I bring this up because I remember some time back, a Canon A1 camera was repeatedly returned to the store with blown electronics. This was eventually sorted out by the user fitting a dedicated flash to his A1 with the camera switched on. On Canon cameras the sliding of contacts of the lens over the contacts of the body must mismatch the circuits.
For Olympus E-system cameras also, it's always advised to turn off the camera. I've heard of some definite problems from people (not a lot, but a few) who have failed to do that.

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Old Mar 1, 2006, 9:37 AM   #4
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It makes sense to turn ANY piece of electronics off while working on them.

Anytime you work on such gadgets you risk static electricity if nothing else.

Personallly I will take risks for an advantage. Is there any advantage to leaving your camera ON, when changing the lens?

I don't think so. Even if the "risk" is rediculously small, what is the advantage that is gained by doing this?

Dave
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Old Mar 1, 2006, 9:37 AM   #5
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I think I read somewhere that leaving the camera on while changing lenses increases the chances of dust adhering to the sensor...the sensor is charged and actually pulls dust onto it. I may be wrong.
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