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Old Apr 2, 2003, 11:39 PM   #1
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Default Too much green color in outdoor shots...

Hi there. I'm having problems with green level in my outdoor shots. Look at the pics below:

First is the original image and second one was corrected in Photoshop. How can I fix this problem in my camera (I'm using Fuji S602)? In most of indoor shots there is no such a problem.. I was shooting in full auto mode.. Maybe there is something with white ballance has to be done? Thanks!
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Old Apr 2, 2003, 11:54 PM   #2
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I wonder if the Super CCD tends towards stronger greens. I was over at the camera shop across the street yesterday and they had a display that showed the same shot taken with all of the various digicams they've got for sale. The shot was of a red double-decker bus.

Every single Finepix camera from the A101 to the M603 showed the bus as slightly orange. Other cameras showed various levels of intensity in the reds, but the Fuji cams without exception tended towards orange.

Could this extra 'greening' that you are seeing be related to the effect in the display?
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 2:20 AM   #3
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Quote:
Could this extra 'greening' that you are seeing be related to the effect in the display?
I am seeing it on the 'reference' pic so it's real. Just Guessing, but a few observations.

There's not a lot of white in this pic for auto white balance to work on. There is a large area of glass which will reflect the sky, but also don't a lot of these buildings have solar tinted glass which is coloured?

This might be one of those shots where fixed daylight white bal. might have worked better, but you weren't to know as you cannot see this on the 602 display.

On a 602 you can set your own pre-set white balance and make pics look how you want. I've rarely had to do this (except mixed light). I don't think the choice of shot is ideal. There is low contrast overall which doesn't help. There's no Exif data in your post so not much more to go on.

What happens when you try a wider range of outdoor scenes, with better lighting, this pic does look a bit flat and 'murky'. Point the cam at some white/grey card in auto WB and see what the RGB levels are - they should each be about the same value.
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 3:02 AM   #4
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Thanks for reply!

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxmagna
I don't think the choice of shot is ideal. There is low contrast overall which doesn't help. There's no Exif data in your post so not much more to go on.

What happens when you try a wider range of outdoor scenes, with better lighting, this pic does look a bit flat and 'murky'. Point the cam at some white/grey card in auto WB and see what the RGB levels are - they should each be about the same value.
This image was taken before the heavy rain and it was actually dark outside.. I think windows have mirorred surfaces so they reflect everything. When I was shooting some scenes with vivid colors (such as macro shots of flowers) there wasn't such a problem. You can look at one of the macros here http://russkih.net/~ulik/albums/macro/aai.jpg. I will try shooting the grey card to check RGB levels. And maybe I should also try shooting with different camera settings.
Thanks again for the post!
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 4:30 AM   #5
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It's not unusual to have to fix pictures in the computer. The one thing about digital photography they don't tell you about is YOU have to play the roll of the processing lab/darkroom. It's not unusual to have to adjust colour/brightness/sharpness/contrast in the "digital darkroom"...many times using the autocorrect will fix things.

One thing about trying to fix it in the camera beforehand is you may have to overcorrect afterwards. I did some experiments with white balance with my camera (Olympus C-700) and I found that the auto white balance was the closest to the original colours over the correct preset and manual white balance.
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 4:51 AM   #6
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I'm suspecting there are issues in common here. Lower light levels seem to push limits of auto-cams, even focus. But what I've found strange about the 602, is you can take pics at night with a wide contrast range or bright outdoors and they are good, but get that flatter lower contrast scene and things like white bal and focus don't seem to track so well.

This is similar to the greyscale tracking we look for in our monitors. The lower the contrast, flatter pics, the eye notices the tracking errors a lot more. I once did some tests putting a white flat field on a range of monitors. After a few minutes looking at the screen, a centre 'hotspot' of about twice the intensity, compared to edges, is often present but not normally noticed.

As you reduce the level of white through shades of gray, the errors caused by different black cut offs and tracking errors of RGB become more noticeable as coloured grey. The point here, is that whilst auto-white balance might be OK at the brighter ends, there is no guarantee the camera sensors will hold the track at lower levels.

So, shooting a grey scale chart and checking the RGB levels would be revealing. I'm sure you could replicate this test, by zooming to a clear North light sky in manual, white bal, then shoot frames at decreasing exposure.
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 1:39 PM   #7
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Thank you very much for information! I really appreciate it! Will try experimenting with grey color..
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 6:04 PM   #8
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You know what, in thr end you got the picture, maybe a tad green but you got the picture ................ the mor ei think about it the more you have to ask if the bigge rcameras are worth it, if you don't TAKE the camera with you you will miss the shot entirely.

My 2c.
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 7:32 PM   #9
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I don't mind making some corrections in photoshop, i was just worrying if it's some problem with my camera. But after reviewing the answers i don't worry anymore. I take my camera everywhere with me since i got it 2 weeks ago and i noticed that among about 100 shots only couple are good
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Old Apr 3, 2003, 8:06 PM   #10
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Does your camera allow for manual white balance settings? If so, use a white card in front of the camera to set the white balance. It works great with my Canon Pro90. Try it if you can.
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