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Old Apr 6, 2003, 8:36 PM   #1
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Default Cameras Rated for Use in Hazardous Atmospheres

I am trying to determine if there are any portable digital cameras hat are rated for use in hazardous atmospheres. That is, are there any "intrinsically safe" cameras available.

A camera of this type would be helpful in industrial or manufacturing area where hazardous atmospheres, such as flammable solvents, were present. My early searches have not identified any such cameras.

I would appreciate knowing if there are any made for use in the US.

Regards,

OboeGary
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Old Apr 6, 2003, 9:41 PM   #2
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never came across a camera like that. you might try looking for some kind of enclosure for cameras, that might have some kind of rating.
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Old Apr 6, 2003, 11:29 PM   #3
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Yeah it sounds like the closest thing to what you are looking for would be a camera housing that prevents contanimants from entering the camera.

I would look for ikelite housings that are used to protect digital cameras underwater while still giving you the full functionality of your camera.
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Old Apr 6, 2003, 11:36 PM   #4
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It's been three years since we reviewed it but I think it is still available, check out the FujiDS-260HD:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/ds260hd.html

-Steve
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 6:00 AM   #5
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The Olympus Stylus is supposed to be water tight as well, but with the extending lens it doesn't look up to the task.
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 8:33 AM   #6
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Most likely, the widespread use of soft plastics in consumer digital cameras will render them completely useless in a situation where they are likey to be exposed to solvents, and solvent vapors. It would probably depend on the individual solvent though. Trichloromethane for instance would completely waste any camera I've ever seen...it softens polycarbonates in just a few seconds. There is hope though, I've seen video cameras in industrial situations with specialized cases to protect them from just about anything. The same concept could be applied here, but you would likely have to throw a big wad of cash at the project.
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 8:54 AM   #7
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I know nothing about this subject, but I thought kit for hazardous area use must be certified to very high standards, and there's the question of what industrial insurance will cover?

Imagine taking a pic in a Methane gas atmosphere and you had auto flash enabled in the menu!! Remember how it works? the high voltage pulse (2-3kv) triggers the discharge from the outer coil through the quartz glass Xenon flash tube!
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 10:54 AM   #8
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you might want to contact FM (Factory Mutual) about this since they are the largest commercial insurer and they have a research arm that deals with these issues

http://www.fmglobal.com/

if you look on flaslights and such used by firefighters you will see the FM diamond symbol usually along with UL and/or MSA for hazardous environments.
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 1:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
if you look on flaslights and such used by firefighters you will see the FM diamond symbol usually along with UL and/or MSA for hazardous environments.
Remember Davey Lamps which were designed for coal miners? Their modern replacement battery flashlights were specially designed and certified. Our Miners regulations and certifications for hazardous and potentially explosive work places are pretty strict. Guess yours in US are similar. Electrical voltage and static, even ELV, has to be carefully considered as a potential hazard.
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Old Apr 7, 2003, 2:00 PM   #10
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i collect miners lamps.

and yes our regs are fairly stiff too.
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