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Old May 5, 2006, 4:38 PM   #1
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Is there any filters that help with a cloudy day out on the water?
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Old May 5, 2006, 10:07 PM   #2
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What do you mean by help? If you're talking about the contrast and color balance, that's easy to tweak in any editor. If you want to do it in-camera, most cameras have adjustable contrast and white balance settings. Check out your users guide for how to do it. If this isn't what you're after, then please repost.

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Old May 5, 2006, 11:37 PM   #3
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no not like that, a filter that will help with making cloudy days not so gray in a photo, make it lighter, and prettier especially on the water. I have tried to edit these pictures to make them look good but cant they appear to be taken with black and white film and they were not .Whale watch season has started and its Washington so we have a lot of gray days..they are all gray and no color in them at all, this happened last year. I have Orange YA2 Red R2 Yellow Y2, I know those are for black and whites and sunsets, UV haze, and the circular polorizer which I know is not for cloudy gray dreery days, anything else I can use to bring color back into a gray gloomy day.. its also a film camara I dont know how much I can play with it, I really have no idea what I am doing, but I already have a photo published and have been picked up to do work with the whibey island tourism commison. so I am doing something right. this is NOT the photo that was published. I am going to have to buy another manual, the camara I am using my husband bought before we were together and I cant find the manual for it
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Old May 6, 2006, 4:37 AM   #4
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I think your problem is more exposure than anything. Shooting over water can be tricky at times. The light meters in the camera does not know how to deal with it very well. You can try using a gray card, the ground or the sky and do your metering off of it. Myself I use a hand held light meter and set my camera to manual and punch in the reading from the hand held light meter into the camera. I also bracket shots as well. Sometimes a warming filter has pleasing results shooting over water. I also suggest taking your film to a Professional photo lab where they will manually adjust each and every picture one at a time. You would be amazed how bad some of these labs can mess up a good photo. Just my two cents worth.

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Old May 6, 2006, 6:04 AM   #5
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A polarizer is great for cutting out glare as long as you have enough light. Light gets polarized reflecting off the surface and there is often an amazing difference with the filter on.
Adjusting the levels should fix the washed out look in the posted shot. It also looks very noisy. Is it a small crop out of a much larger shot?
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Old May 6, 2006, 9:41 AM   #6
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thats close to the orignal I didnt crop much out of it.The scanner makes it look grainy, theorginal photo is much sharper and cleaner just no color to it. thanks everyone
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Old May 6, 2006, 5:08 PM   #7
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Seeing that you are shooting film, I think your best bet is to try the UV/haze filter in these situations. Film is more sensitive to UV than digital sensors, and UV can fool the metering in the camera, since the metering sensors are solid state, and also less sensitive to UV.

The reason your scans look grainy appears to be that you are scanning at a fairly low resolution. If you don't use the scans for anything critical, it doesn't really matter.

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Old May 6, 2006, 8:02 PM   #8
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A graduated neural density filter will help with the over-exposed sky in pictures shot over water (or anywhere else). It takes some practice to reduce the "blown out" skies problem.

It's possible to simulate this during post-processing, but it's not simple and doesn't do as good a job (at least I haven't been able to pull it off consistently).

I'm basing my comments on the Orca shot.

We have a lot of gray skies where I live (Pacific Northwest) that screw up some beautiful scenery shots. My GND filter helps a lot.
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Old May 7, 2006, 11:05 PM   #9
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Thank you, I am going to try just the haze filter for now, besides my next whale watch is supposed to be very nice weather out, but no whales today so I didnt get to try it with the haze alone, i go once a week so I have plenty of trys and practice to get it right hehe
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Old May 8, 2006, 1:38 AM   #10
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You can try to use a 81B warm-up filter for your pics, it gives a stronger effect than haze or 81A warm-up filters and also cuts out UV. It's also possible to combine it with a polariser or an ND grad. A good lens hood helps a lot when shooting on the water.

Just my $0.02
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