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Old May 6, 2006, 6:08 PM   #1
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i came across this question in another forum. would greatly appreciate any info to forward. "Iwent to a raptor and falcon show and was trying to capture the falcons in flight I was using a canon EOS350 d digital slr with a 300mm zoom lens the problem was when taking shots against the sky as a background all I got were silhouetted pictures. can anyone help."
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Old May 6, 2006, 6:28 PM   #2
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About all you can do in this situation is to manually adjust exposure to get detail in the bird. This will overexpose the sky to where it is just washed out white. Post processing can fix it. Another way is to use High Dynamic Range software. In some of these programs, you can profile your camera, and then be able to use the increased dynamic range from just one exposure. (it doesn't really increase DR, just boosts shadows and adjusts saturation and contrast)

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Old May 6, 2006, 6:37 PM   #3
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thank you for your response. would a different lens do any beter. if so, which lens and why.
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Old May 6, 2006, 11:13 PM   #4
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No, another lens won't make a difference in exposure. (Well, some do have better contrast characteristics, but the difference isn't great.)

There are normally two ways to deal with this. The problem is the same in either case.

The problem is that the sky is so bright that it overwhelms the dark part (where the bird is) so the camera thinks "this is a really bright subject, I need to darken it" and it does... which underexposes the bird.

To solve this you either need to use manual exposure settings (where you set both exposure and shutter speed) or you need to use exposure compensation. The end result will be the same, what VTphotog said. It will over expose the sky, but properly expose the bird.

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Old May 7, 2006, 5:58 AM   #5
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I think this camera has options for centre weighted and spot metering. These should give better results. Spot will expose for the subject in the centre which is probably the subject. Centre weighted will expose for the whole frame but the centre area will have more influence over the resulting exposure.



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Old May 7, 2006, 8:31 AM   #6
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thank you all. i will pass on the great advise. :-)
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