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Old Apr 8, 2009, 4:32 AM   #11
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OK, I wondered if you were using the same brand camera as mine. Looks like not, but you didn't say either way.
My Fuji S6500fd has recently also developed a major problem with blown highlights. It's not the way I use it sadly, it has either a sensor fault or a aperture iris fault. Still shoot acceptably in low light or indoors. It's like the dynamic range has been severely cut back on the bright side.
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 6:58 AM   #12
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There's also the opposite side of the coin from blown highlights - shadows that are too dark. I find that, on a bright, sunny day, when I try to avoid blown highlights, I often get areas that are too dark. Sometimes these dark areas can be brightened post processing, but at the cost of digital noise. Many new cameras have dynamic range adjusters, which seem to help, but they also introduce noise. I've read that the problem has grown worse with the use of tinier sensors.
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 7:36 AM   #13
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mr.sneezy wrote:
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My Fuji S6500fd has recently also developed a major problem with blown highlights. It's not the way I use it sadly, it has either a sensor fault or a aperture iris fault.
I'd suggest that you downsize an image to around 640x480 pixels and post a sample for members to look at. A bad sensor is pretty easy to spot in most cases (and I've seen them fail in the same way, usually with bad overexposure in outdoor lighting, with lines through the image captured, etc.).

Use something that retains the image EXIF when you downsize one for posting (the EXIF contains camera settings we can look at, just in case you have something set incorrectly causing your issues, versus a hardware fault).

I often use the free Irfanview for downsizing. When you save as a jpeg file, you'll see a retain EXIF box (it's probably already checked by default). You'll find the menu choice for downsizing under "Image>Resize/Resample"

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Old Apr 8, 2009, 8:03 AM   #14
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Hi Jim, don't want to go off topic here.
My problem is well proven already, in fact I'm half way stripping down the camera totally (I have photos of that) to see if there is anything I can do.
It's all on this thread, most info is in the first few and the last few.
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=16
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 8:33 AM   #15
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Interesting. I looked through the images you posted, and the problem only seems to come up when you're shooting into very harsh lighting (as in the first image you posted to that thread). The metering was multi-segment and it should have handled it a bit better (and I don't see lines through the image, which usually accompanies a CCD failure when one is overexposing). So, I'm wondering if something else is going on.

Are you using a lens hood? If not, use one. You can also use your hand/arm to help shield the lens from any harsher light when shooting.

Are you using any filters?

If so, you may be seeing loss of contrast from flare (sometimes called a "veiling flare", giving an overexposed, hazy, washed out look to images). Depending on how much light reflection you get between optical elements, you may also see problems with metering and AF.

Anytime you add another piece of glass, it can cause issues. Of course, many lens designs are a bit flare prone in harsher lighting, even without any filters installed.

So, remove any filters you have on it, see if the problem is better or worse in harsher lighting, and make sure the front lens element is well shielded from most harsher light (use a lens hood, arm/hand, stand under some cover, etc., so that you're shading the lens from any brighter light sources whenever possible).

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Old Apr 8, 2009, 9:31 PM   #16
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I will test that Jim.

Two points though.

It was fine in those high brightness conditions for the first year I had it, it suddenly started this after a long plane flight. I'veduplicated shots done prior that were great, now they are blown out. I use a UV filter always and sometimes a polarizer instead. Prior to the plane flight they caused no issues...

I think it might be a mechanical issue.
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 11:08 PM   #17
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Sensors do go bad sometimes. My Canon S1IS work flawlessly for 4 years and over 5000 images then started having bright areas in images turn up pink and purple. Canon replaced the sensor for free.

I would suggest an email to customer service to see if this has been a widespread issue with your camera.
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