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Old Apr 23, 2003, 1:58 PM   #1
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Default Good (Decent) Camera for Interior shots

I am a property manager and need a digital camera for interior shots of apartments. I need to shoot rooms and conditions of walls etc. in the event of property damage. Most prints would be 5x7 with occassional 8x10's.

My guess is that the equivalent of a 28mm lens (or less?) wouuld be best, but I don't know where to start looking. Everything that I have checked out so far starts with the equivalent of 38mm or so.

As an aside, when I travel, I love to take landscapes and I am tempted by the optical zooms of 8x or so. I am extremely comfortable with a 85 to 200 mm zoom on my SLR, but don't like the bulky size. Granted, the optical zoom is on my wish list and isn't necessary for my professional needs, but ...

Thanks for the help.

Rick Talcott
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 6:09 PM   #2
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for indoor use, i'd go with the canon a70, its 3mp and has af assist. As for wide angle, the a70 can use a wideangle add-on lense with adapter which should suit your needs. For zoom, the a70 is capable of taking add-on lenses so you can use telephoto lenses on your camera if you ever want to.
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 6:21 PM   #3
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Think about using an external flash. With add on wide angle adaptor lenses, a puny internal flash will struggle on angle and light output, With most wide angle adaptor lenses you will get some 'barrel distortion' on vertical edges (slightly curved inwards). So if that worries you, you may need to settle for a bit less than the wide ange will do.

On very large wall areas, you could learn to take 3 or 4 shots on a tripod and 'zip' them together in software. Wouldn't it be handy if you could mount a digicam on a tripod in the centre of a room and it motored itself round, taking flash shots totalling 360 degrees!
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 9:06 PM   #4
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Default Re: Good (Decent) Camera for Interior shots

Quote:
Originally Posted by ricktalcott
My guess is that the equivalent of a 28mm lens (or less?) wouuld be best, but I don't know where to start looking. Everything that I have checked out so far starts with the equivalent of 38mm or so.
Nikon CP5000 and Minolta D7xx starts at 28mm ( without add on lens)
Personally , I always consider 28mm a minimum for indoor shooting , with or without people ; 38 mm is just too long (not wide enough) for interior shooting.
How about trying some camera at store interior ?, you will able to judge by yourself .
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 10:46 PM   #5
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You are absolutely right about needing a 28mm lens for shooting interiors! I do a lot of this, and I purchased the WCON-08E 0.8 teleconverter for my camera. This wide angle adapter has very sharp focus and no vignetting, a couple of problems I encountered when shopping for a lens that would give me a wider view. While it only converts my 38mm lens to about 30mm, this is sufficient. Note: because of the larger size of the lens, it partially blocks the built-in flash on my camera and casts a shadow of the lens; this may be something to consider. An external flash took care of that problem for me. You may find it more convenient to go with the Nikon or Minolta models that KCan suggested.
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Old Apr 24, 2003, 2:01 PM   #6
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Also look for a camera with a focus assist beam...digitals struggle with focusing in low-light conditions.

Also be aware that you need some detail in the picture in order for a digital camera to focus...a digital can't focus on a plain white wall, or on horizontal detail (without some vertial information) like horizontal blinds...in that situation you'd have to hold the camera sideways and then rotate the picture after:

http://www.howstuffworks.com/autofocus3.htm
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Old Apr 25, 2003, 11:24 PM   #7
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Excellent link, Mike_PEAT! Another tip on focusing when a blank wall is in the center of the picture is to pre-focus on a vertical object where contrast is high (door frame, edge of wall, etc.) that is the same distance away as your subject, and re-frame your shot with the shutter half pressed before taking the picture. Just make sure the exposure is the same!
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