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Old Apr 25, 2003, 1:17 PM   #1
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Default Random questions about features. Yes, I've read the glossary

What is the fullest range of aperture settings? I've noticed some cameras go 1.8-8, or only as high as 3.8. Also what is a decent, good, above average range? How do you know when to adjust these settings?

What do parallax errors look like?

What are drive modes?

What is the point of a movie mode w/ no sound?

What features are required for the highest quality picture?

Do all cameras come w/ EXIF, can you see these settings on the camera?

Which colour filter is better? GRGB or CYGM? what are some others? Does this really matter?

What is a decent continuous/burst speed?

Is it better to have After image or before image buffer? iS this type of info listed in the specs?

Is TIFF or Raw necessary"?

Is sharpening better if saved for digital darkroom and best if not used on the camera?

Do all cameras have noise reduction? is it necessary?

Which cameras are best at low noise and artifacts?

Can you control jaggies? Do all cameras have aliasing abilities to help deter this?

What is the point of having ISO above 200 if the pics will always be noisey?

How do you know which type of interpolation(nearest neighbor, bilinear, bicubic, fractal) a camera has, or is the best for digital darkroom?

When it comes to gamma and gamma correction can you or does the camera control this. Or is this something in digital darkroom?

When it comes to blooming, do all cameras have antiblooming gates?

Are AE locks necessary?

How does aperture priority work?

DOF questions. The greater the depth the more detail? The larger the aperture, the higher the DOF?

What is 9AIAF focus or 5 point AIAF focus? One shot AF
• AI Servo AF
• AI Focus AF
• Manual focus---what do these mean?

What are good/decent/necessary types of focus needed for manual focus?


What is the actual range for shutter speed? What is a good, decent, above average range?

What is a good lense?

What are the different types of AF illuminator, or does this vary greatly by manufacturer and not industry standard?

What is a good range for macro capabilites?

Ok, I think that is al, and that is enough!
TIA
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Old Apr 25, 2003, 2:30 PM   #2
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I think you would be better off with a book on digital imaging!

These topics will take too long time for one guy to answer and you prob. will start lots of discussions. (...I know ...its a discussion forum).
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Old Apr 25, 2003, 2:49 PM   #3
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TIA

Try this web site

http://www.shortcourses.com/choosing/contents.htm

Phil
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Old Apr 25, 2003, 7:36 PM   #4
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Default Re: Random questions about features. Yes, I've read the glos

I'll tackle some of the questions.

What is the fullest range of aperture settings? I've noticed some cameras go 1.8-8, or only as high as 3.8. Also what is a decent, good, above average range? How do you know when to adjust these settings?

That depends on the camera, and depending on the type of photography you want to do. Just remember that today's digital cameras (with the exception of certain DSLRs) have a greater depth of field than their 35mm counterparts. The Olympus C-4000Z - for example - has 5 times the DOF. Therefore, when I set my C-4000Z at f2.8, in 35mm equivalency, it's actually at f14.

What features are required for the highest quality picture?

- Lossless compression and/or RAW.
- High quality lens.

Just to name a few.

Do all cameras come w/ EXIF, can you see these settings on the camera?

I'm willing to bet YES.

Which colour filter is better? GRGB or CYGM? what are some others? Does this really matter?

I'm not really sure which is better, but it does matter in post-processing work. Also, there is CMYK.

Is TIFF or Raw necessary"?

No.

Is sharpening better if saved for digital darkroom and best if not used on the camera?

Depends on how well the camera performs with its in-camera sharpen function.

Do all cameras have noise reduction? is it necessary?

Only cameras that have shutter speeds slower than 1 second (plus/minus a few seconds). And no, it is not necessary, but good to have.

Can you control jaggies? Do all cameras have aliasing abilities to help deter this?

I don't think so.

What is the point of having ISO above 200 if the pics will always be noisey?

Higher ISO makes the camera CCD more sensitive to light. Therefore, it can be useful under low-light situations or when shutter speeds need to be faster rather than slower.

When it comes to gamma and gamma correction can you or does the camera control this. Or is this something in digital darkroom?

Digital Darkroom.

Are AE locks necessary?

A good example of where AE is useful is when you are Pano-stitching images together. Some Pano-stitch software do not compensate for the difference in exposure.

How does aperture priority work?

Simple. You only have to worry about the aperture setting, and your camera will automatically set the shutter speed depending on its meter reading.

DOF questions. The greater the depth the more detail? The larger the aperture, the higher the DOF?

High DOF=More in focus.
Smaller aperture=High DOF.
Higher f-stop number = Smaller aperture.

• Manual focus---what do these mean?

You adjust the distance to where you want your camera lens to focus on.

What is the actual range for shutter speed? What is a good, decent, above average range?

Again, it's very dependant on the type of photos you are shooting.




Feel free to correct any mistakes.



Oz
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Old Apr 25, 2003, 10:15 PM   #5
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Q:What is the fullest range of aperture settings?
Aepends on the camera, some have a greater range, some less.

Q:What do parallax errors look like?
A: http://www.megapixel.net/html/articl...ewfinders.html

Q:What are drive modes?
A:The term "drive" comes from driving (advancing) the film automatically between shots, so changing the drive mode to multiple shots is akin to the camera automatically advancing the film quickly so you can get a multiple shots in a few seconds.

Q:What is the point of a movie mode w/ no sound?
A:Saving space. Also, you may take hi-res photos of a room and then take some low-res video just to show where in the room those pictures originated from.

Q:What features are required for the highest quality picture?
A:I like larger lenses to let in more light. It's everything from good glass lenses, to a good CCD, to good firmware (software in the camera). Most consumer cameras are ok, but if you want the highest quality expect to spend thousands of dollars.

Q:Is TIFF or Raw necessary"?
A:Maybe to a professional...many here shoot with higher JPEG compression and they can't tell the difference.

Q:Is sharpening better if saved for digital darkroom and best if not used on the camera?
A:I like to leave it until it gets to the computer...once you distort a picture in the camera you can't go back, but if you fool around with it in photo editing software you still got your original.

Qo all cameras have noise reduction? is it necessary?
A:Only better ones do, and it's only for 1 second or slower.

Q:Which cameras are best at low noise and artifacts?
A:Consumer cameras, each has its quirks.

Q:What is the point of having ISO above 200 if the pics will always be noisey?
A:What's the point of having ISO above 200 in film if the pics will be noisier? Same answer. I shot a while back where I couldn't use the flash, used ISO400 and got great pictures.

Q:How do you know which type of interpolation(nearest neighbor, bilinear, bicubic, fractal) a camera has, or is the best for digital darkroom?
A:Try it...actually, there is experience involved but it also depends on what your picture is about.

Q:Are AE locks necessary?
A:Panaramics, where each picture has to have the same settings, or a situation where you want to lock the exposure.

Q:How does aperture priority work?
A:You use that for times when you want to open up or close down the lens (if you want the background blurry or sharp) and then the camera will compensate with the shutter speed. The shutter priority is the opposite, you adjust the shutter to freeze high-speed action or blur it, and the aperture will compensate.

QOF questions. The greater the depth the more detail? The larger the aperture, the higher the DOF?
A: Play with http://www.photonhead.com/exposure/simcam.htm and you'll get the idea.

Q:What are good/decent/necessary types of focus needed for manual focus?
A: Don't understand this one...you're stuck with the focusing your camera comes with.

Q:What is the actual range for shutter speed? What is a good, decent, above average range?
A:Again it's what comes with the camera. And the setting you choose depends on the situation (below 1/30th (and long zooms in lower light) you need a tripod or steady surface)

Q:What is a good lense?
A:For what? Some like a 3x zoom, others like a 10x...some like to see a certain brandname like Leica or Carl Zeiss (had that on my SLR).

Q:What are the different types of AF illuminator, or does this vary greatly by manufacturer and not industry standard?
Aepends on the camera's needs, if the camera manufacturer puts one on...Olympus tends not to (even though we yell at them that we need one) and instead puts it on their megabucks flash.

Q:What is a good range for macro capabilites?
Aepends on your needs...some people need the ability for microscopic pictures (then they hook the camera up to a microscope).

Wow. A lot of questions. If you read through your camera's manuals, you may want to start reading general books on photography, not necessarily digital photography...check your library...the camera's manual teaches you how to use the camera, and photography books covers all the rest...just like a car's manual doesn't teach you how to drive. Also check out http://www.photocourse.com for a free online "book" on digital photography.
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Old Apr 26, 2003, 12:16 AM   #6
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Mike_PEAT,

That simcam link you gave is great. It shows how you can keep the same amount of light on the scene but change the depth of field. Very nice. I’m going to have to play more with it before I feel I really get it, but just watching that work was eye opening.

And your reason for having silent movie mode is one I didn’t think of. I was going to say it was useless, but you proved me wrong!

Honey,
I agree with Klaus DK on this one. If you have this many questions (and they are good ones) a book is the best place to go. I'd check your library first, though. That way you can find one that explains things in a way you understand and has its facts right.

Like the others, I haven’t answered everything, but I’ve answered many of them.

What is the fullest range of aperture settings? I've noticed some cameras go 1.8-8, or only as high as 3.8. Also what is a decent, good, above average range? How do you know when to adjust these settings?

Others have answered this well. As to when you adjust the aperture…. You do it to adjust depth of field (DOF) or to let in more/less light. There has been some good DOF posts on this forum recently.

What is a decent continuous/burst speed?

If the camera takes about 3 pictures a second, you are doing very well. If it can do that rate for 3 or so seconds, you are doing well. Some of this is based on the speed of the interface to the digital film. A really slow card won’t be able to keep up, and a faster card will eventually exceed the speed with which the camera can take the pictures.

The absolute best camera at this that I know of is the Nikon D1H. It can take (based on the specs) 5 pictures a second for 8 seconds (40 total pictures.) Of course, it only has a 2.74MP CCD, but costs over $3,000. It should be said that this camera is geared towards professional sports photographers for newspapers, for whom incredible detail isn’t as important as getting that player exactly in mid throw.

Is it better to have After image or before image buffer? iS this type of info listed in the specs?

I’ve never heard of “before image buffer” and I can only guess what “after image buffer” is. After image buffer is used, I assume, to buffer the picture before writing to the memory card. They won’t tell you how big it is, and you don’t really care. What you care about is how many pictures the camera can take before not taking any more because it has to write them out. While you aren’t taking a picture, the camera is writing the picture to the memory card…. So unless you take lots of pictures back-to-back, this isn’t as big an issue. But once you miss one picture because the camera is “busy” writing, you’ll be really mad.

Is sharpening better if saved for digital darkroom and best if not used on the camera?

I don’t believe sharpening can be disabled unless you shoot raw. You can set the camera to do the least amount of sharpening, but I don’t believe you can disable it (at least on most digital cameras.) It should be said that his is just my opinion, I don’t have hard facts to back it up.

Do all cameras have noise reduction? is it necessary?

I believe that all cameras do some noise reduction, at all ISOs. I don’t know that for a fact (and others here have said that isn’t true) it’s just something which I believe. The noise reduction would have less to do at the lower ISO settings, but I bet they are still used. My assumption is that there is always noise in a picture, there is just less of it with a lower ISO. Again, this is my opinion, I don’t have hard facts to back it up.

Can you control jaggies? Do all cameras have aliasing abilities to help deter this?

If you mean “can the photographer” control jaggies, then the answer is partially yes. You can do post processing to reduce the effect. Being mindful of the angle of the line compared to you when you take the picture might help, I don’t know. I believe all cameras have some level of anti-aliasing. Again, this isn’t based on facts, just my opinion. I expect they all do to some extent. It just works better in some than in others. I’ve heard enough comments like “this new model does a better job at encoding diagonal cables than the previous one.” But “anti-aliasing” wasn’t a huge feature in the previous model. (I’m thinking of the Canon D60 vs. the 10D.)

What is the point of having ISO above 200 if the pics will always be noisey?

Well, so you can use programs like neatimage to remove the noise. Also, one of the reasons you pay more for the expensive cameras is that they have less noise at higher ISO settings. Plus, you just might not be able to get the picture without setting it to a higher ISO. A noisy picture is better than none at all.

Are AE locks necessary?

It’s also useful when taking a tricky picture. Say you have a very white subject (an egret is a good example.) The camera isn’t expecting a perfectly white subject, so that will fool it and if you metered the exposure off the bird the rest of the picture could be too dark. So you would lock the exposure on a place with more average light (hopefully 18% gray) then reframe the picture for the layout you want. The same logic works for focus lock. Lock the focus where you want it, then reframe so the subject is where you want in the frame.

DOF questions. The greater the depth the more detail? The larger the aperture, the higher the DOF?

I’m a little lost on this one, but I’ll guess. Depth of field doesn’t really relate to detail. It just describes what will be in focus. There is a different thread here that covers depth of field going on right now. I’d read there, as I recall the answers were better than I could give.

What is 9AIAF focus or 5 point AIAF focus?

This relates to how many auto focus points there are. The more there are, the more flexibility you have in choosing how you compose the picture and pick the point focused on in the scene. Of course, assuming the scene is fairly static, you could always use focus lock and recompose. It should be pointed out that in some cameras not all focus points are created equal. For example, in the Canon 10D, the center AF point will lock focus faster and with different types of edge contrast than the other AF points. To me, this is something which is very good to know.

One shot AF

This is only a guess! I believe this refers to the focus being redone each time you take the picture. This is the most common mode.

AI Servo AF

I think this is a really cool feature… but really only useful in specific situations. For an example of this, check out this thread:

http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/re...essage=4887139

It’s the best example of AI Server that I have seen. Basically it allows the camera to track a moving object and keep it in focus. And this includes even when the subject moves off of the AF point you locked with and into another AF point.

AI Focus AF

I don’t know what this is. I’ve never heard of it.

What are good/decent/necessary types of focus needed for manual focus?

The best thing for manual focus is a focusing ring. For example, the Minolta DiMAGE 7Hi has one, but the Nikon 5700 doesn’t. You can manual focus with the 5700, but you have to use a “up” and “down” button to cause the lens to rotate. Not nearly as easy to use as a real manual focus ring. (Both are very good cameras.)

The only feature other than a ring is the ability to use full-time manual override when focusing. I would assume that all consumer digitals have this. It just means that you can use AF to focus, and then use manual to make it even better without having to tell the camera to disable Autofocus. That just by adjusting the focus manually the camera would stop AF for that picture (or until you requested it.)

What is the actual range for shutter speed? What is a good, decent, above average range?

To me, this is only really relevant if you want to take pictures of the nighttime sky. Then you want to take exposure measured in minutes. Most cameras have the flexibility of shutter speeds that almost everyone needs.

What is a good lense?

I agree with Mike_PEAT here. “good” is a question of how you use it. It would be impossible to have a lens that is “good” for everyone. A few things are almost always good. As little lens flare as possible (although it can be used artistically), no distortion and vignetting through the entire zoom range. Very low f-stop, is very lite, and very cheap. But you never get all three of those… except in very special cases like a 50mm f1.8 lens for an SLR. Small, light, and the Canon version costs less than 70 bucks. Not bad.

What are the different types of AF illuminator, or does this vary greatly by manufacturer and not industry standard?

I have no idea, but I know that is quite handy to have an AF illuminator. From what I’ve seen, the trend seems to be to not have the feature (saving money.) Many people don’t need them, but when you do they are invaluable.
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Old Apr 26, 2003, 12:02 PM   #7
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Oh man, I didn't realize my questions would require a whole book. I'm sorry. I do appreciate your responses though.
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Old Apr 26, 2003, 1:32 PM   #8
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The rest of us have learned through reading and experience. You have to remember that the people here are doing this in their spare time, and you got to put in some effort in yourself.

Just remember you can't learn how to drive a car just from the manual that came with it.
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Old Apr 28, 2003, 12:32 PM   #9
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Oh, Mike I know. That is all I've been doing the past few weeks is reading, and reading, and reading. Alot of it gets confusing and just wanted to come here for clarity. I thought my questions were 'idiot' (for lack of a better word) type questions and I was not understanding some small basic point. When I do research I get directed to a lot of sites that want to sell me stuff, or restate the same things I've already learned. So it gets frustrating after awhile.

Thanks again for your time.
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Old May 2, 2003, 4:18 PM   #10
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Thanks again for all of your help. You all gave me some awesome websites.
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